Correlation of occupational stress with depression, anxiety, and sleep in Korean dentists: Cross-sectional study

Kyung Won Song, Won Seok Choi, Hee Jung Jee, Chi Sung Yuh, Yong Ku Kim, Leen Kim, Heon-Jeong Lee, Chul Hyun Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to investigate the degree of occupational stress and the clinical mental state of dentists. In addition, we investigated the correlation of occupational stress with depression, anxiety, and sleep among dentists in Korea. Methods: A cross-sectional survey on 231 dentists was conducted using the Doctor Job Stress Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), State-Trait Anxiety Index (STAI), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Correlation of occupational stress with mental health was investigated by adjusted multiple regression analysis. Results: The scores of CES-D, STAI, and PSQI revealed a significant correlation with the Doctor Job Stress Scale (t=3.93, P<0.0001; t=4.05, P<0.0001; t=4.18, P<0.0001, respectively). In particular, patient factors and clinical responsibility/judgment factors were significantly associated with depression (t=2.80, P=0.0056; t=4.93, P<0.0001, respectively), anxiety (t=2.35, P=0.0195; t=5.11, P<0.0001, respectively), and sleep (t=3.78, P=0.0002; t=4.30, P<0.0001, respectively), whereas work factors were not associated with any mental health state. Conclusions: This study confirms that dentists as professions experience more severe mental states. For successful mental health care among dentists, stress management focusing on interpersonal relationship with patients and responsibility as an expert rather than the intensity of work should be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Article number398
JournalBMC Psychiatry
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Dec 12

Fingerprint

Dentists
Sleep
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Mental Health
Epidemiologic Studies
Korea
Regression Analysis
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Dentist
  • Depression
  • Mental health
  • Occupational stress
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Correlation of occupational stress with depression, anxiety, and sleep in Korean dentists : Cross-sectional study. / Song, Kyung Won; Choi, Won Seok; Jee, Hee Jung; Yuh, Chi Sung; Kim, Yong Ku; Kim, Leen; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Cho, Chul Hyun.

In: BMC Psychiatry, Vol. 17, No. 1, 398, 12.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Song, Kyung Won ; Choi, Won Seok ; Jee, Hee Jung ; Yuh, Chi Sung ; Kim, Yong Ku ; Kim, Leen ; Lee, Heon-Jeong ; Cho, Chul Hyun. / Correlation of occupational stress with depression, anxiety, and sleep in Korean dentists : Cross-sectional study. In: BMC Psychiatry. 2017 ; Vol. 17, No. 1.
@article{147ce14abe9a426e8cd6a7e6eb88e263,
title = "Correlation of occupational stress with depression, anxiety, and sleep in Korean dentists: Cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Background: This study aimed to investigate the degree of occupational stress and the clinical mental state of dentists. In addition, we investigated the correlation of occupational stress with depression, anxiety, and sleep among dentists in Korea. Methods: A cross-sectional survey on 231 dentists was conducted using the Doctor Job Stress Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), State-Trait Anxiety Index (STAI), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Correlation of occupational stress with mental health was investigated by adjusted multiple regression analysis. Results: The scores of CES-D, STAI, and PSQI revealed a significant correlation with the Doctor Job Stress Scale (t=3.93, P<0.0001; t=4.05, P<0.0001; t=4.18, P<0.0001, respectively). In particular, patient factors and clinical responsibility/judgment factors were significantly associated with depression (t=2.80, P=0.0056; t=4.93, P<0.0001, respectively), anxiety (t=2.35, P=0.0195; t=5.11, P<0.0001, respectively), and sleep (t=3.78, P=0.0002; t=4.30, P<0.0001, respectively), whereas work factors were not associated with any mental health state. Conclusions: This study confirms that dentists as professions experience more severe mental states. For successful mental health care among dentists, stress management focusing on interpersonal relationship with patients and responsibility as an expert rather than the intensity of work should be considered.",
keywords = "Anxiety, Dentist, Depression, Mental health, Occupational stress, Sleep",
author = "Song, {Kyung Won} and Choi, {Won Seok} and Jee, {Hee Jung} and Yuh, {Chi Sung} and Kim, {Yong Ku} and Leen Kim and Heon-Jeong Lee and Cho, {Chul Hyun}",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1186/s12888-017-1568-8",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
journal = "BMC Psychiatry",
issn = "1471-244X",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Correlation of occupational stress with depression, anxiety, and sleep in Korean dentists

T2 - Cross-sectional study

AU - Song, Kyung Won

AU - Choi, Won Seok

AU - Jee, Hee Jung

AU - Yuh, Chi Sung

AU - Kim, Yong Ku

AU - Kim, Leen

AU - Lee, Heon-Jeong

AU - Cho, Chul Hyun

PY - 2017/12/12

Y1 - 2017/12/12

N2 - Background: This study aimed to investigate the degree of occupational stress and the clinical mental state of dentists. In addition, we investigated the correlation of occupational stress with depression, anxiety, and sleep among dentists in Korea. Methods: A cross-sectional survey on 231 dentists was conducted using the Doctor Job Stress Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), State-Trait Anxiety Index (STAI), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Correlation of occupational stress with mental health was investigated by adjusted multiple regression analysis. Results: The scores of CES-D, STAI, and PSQI revealed a significant correlation with the Doctor Job Stress Scale (t=3.93, P<0.0001; t=4.05, P<0.0001; t=4.18, P<0.0001, respectively). In particular, patient factors and clinical responsibility/judgment factors were significantly associated with depression (t=2.80, P=0.0056; t=4.93, P<0.0001, respectively), anxiety (t=2.35, P=0.0195; t=5.11, P<0.0001, respectively), and sleep (t=3.78, P=0.0002; t=4.30, P<0.0001, respectively), whereas work factors were not associated with any mental health state. Conclusions: This study confirms that dentists as professions experience more severe mental states. For successful mental health care among dentists, stress management focusing on interpersonal relationship with patients and responsibility as an expert rather than the intensity of work should be considered.

AB - Background: This study aimed to investigate the degree of occupational stress and the clinical mental state of dentists. In addition, we investigated the correlation of occupational stress with depression, anxiety, and sleep among dentists in Korea. Methods: A cross-sectional survey on 231 dentists was conducted using the Doctor Job Stress Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), State-Trait Anxiety Index (STAI), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Correlation of occupational stress with mental health was investigated by adjusted multiple regression analysis. Results: The scores of CES-D, STAI, and PSQI revealed a significant correlation with the Doctor Job Stress Scale (t=3.93, P<0.0001; t=4.05, P<0.0001; t=4.18, P<0.0001, respectively). In particular, patient factors and clinical responsibility/judgment factors were significantly associated with depression (t=2.80, P=0.0056; t=4.93, P<0.0001, respectively), anxiety (t=2.35, P=0.0195; t=5.11, P<0.0001, respectively), and sleep (t=3.78, P=0.0002; t=4.30, P<0.0001, respectively), whereas work factors were not associated with any mental health state. Conclusions: This study confirms that dentists as professions experience more severe mental states. For successful mental health care among dentists, stress management focusing on interpersonal relationship with patients and responsibility as an expert rather than the intensity of work should be considered.

KW - Anxiety

KW - Dentist

KW - Depression

KW - Mental health

KW - Occupational stress

KW - Sleep

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85038013182&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85038013182&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12888-017-1568-8

DO - 10.1186/s12888-017-1568-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 29233107

AN - SCOPUS:85038013182

VL - 17

JO - BMC Psychiatry

JF - BMC Psychiatry

SN - 1471-244X

IS - 1

M1 - 398

ER -