CRISPR versus GMOs: Public acceptance and valuation

Aaron M. Shew, L. Lanier Nalley, Heather A. Snell, Rodolfo M. Nayga, Jr, Bruce L. Dixon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CRISPR gene-editing has major implications for agriculture and food security. However, no studies have evaluated the public acceptance and valuation of CRISPR-produced food. As such, we conducted a multi-country assessment of consumers’ willingness-to-consume (WTC) and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for CRISPR-produced food compared to conventional and genetically modified (GM) foods, respectively. In the USA, Canada, Belgium, France, and Australia, 56, 47, 46, 30, and 51% of respondents, respectively, indicated they would consume both GM and CRISPR food. We also found that biotechnology familiarity and perceptions of safety were the primary drivers for WTC CRISPR and GM food. Moreover, respondents valued CRISPR and GM food similarly – substantially less than conventional food – which could be detrimental for meeting future food demand.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-80
Number of pages10
JournalGlobal Food Security
Volume19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats
genetically modified foods
Genetically Modified Food
valuation
willingness to pay
acceptance
food
Food
food security
Belgium
biotechnology
France
Canada
agriculture
Food Supply
Biotechnology
Agriculture
familiarity
public
genes

Keywords

  • Agricultural biotechnology
  • CRISPR
  • Food regulation
  • GMOs
  • Public acceptance
  • Willingness-to-pay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Ecology
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Safety Research

Cite this

Shew, A. M., Nalley, L. L., Snell, H. A., Nayga, Jr, R. M., & Dixon, B. L. (2018). CRISPR versus GMOs: Public acceptance and valuation. Global Food Security, 19, 71-80. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gfs.2018.10.005

CRISPR versus GMOs : Public acceptance and valuation. / Shew, Aaron M.; Nalley, L. Lanier; Snell, Heather A.; Nayga, Jr, Rodolfo M.; Dixon, Bruce L.

In: Global Food Security, Vol. 19, 01.12.2018, p. 71-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shew, AM, Nalley, LL, Snell, HA, Nayga, Jr, RM & Dixon, BL 2018, 'CRISPR versus GMOs: Public acceptance and valuation', Global Food Security, vol. 19, pp. 71-80. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gfs.2018.10.005
Shew AM, Nalley LL, Snell HA, Nayga, Jr RM, Dixon BL. CRISPR versus GMOs: Public acceptance and valuation. Global Food Security. 2018 Dec 1;19:71-80. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gfs.2018.10.005
Shew, Aaron M. ; Nalley, L. Lanier ; Snell, Heather A. ; Nayga, Jr, Rodolfo M. ; Dixon, Bruce L. / CRISPR versus GMOs : Public acceptance and valuation. In: Global Food Security. 2018 ; Vol. 19. pp. 71-80.
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