Criteria for approximating certain microgravity flow boiling characteristics in Earth gravity

Herman Merte, Jaeseok Park, William W. Shultz, Robert B. Keller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The forces governing flow boiling, aside from system pressure, are buoyancy, liquid momentum, interfacial surface tensions, and liquid viscosity. Guidance for approximating certain aspects of the flow boiling process in microgravity can be obtained in Earth gravity research by the imposition of a liquid velocity parallel to a flat heater surface in the inverted position, horizontal, or nearly horizontal, by having buoyancy hold the heated liquid and vapor formed close to the heater surface. Bounds on the velocities of interest are obtained from several dimensionless numbers: a two-phase Richardson number, a two-phase Weber number, and a Bond number. For the fluid used in the experimental work here, liquid velocities in the range U = 5-10cm/sec are judged to be critical for changes in behavior of the flow boiling process. Experimental results are presented for flow boiling heat transfer, concentrating on orientations that provide the largest reductions in buoyancy parallel to the heater surface, varying ± 5 degrees from facing horizontal downward. Results are presented for velocity, orientation, and subcooling effects on nucleation, dryout, and heat transfer. Two different heater surfaces were used: a thin gold film on a polished quartz substrate, acting as a heater and resistance thermometer, and a gold-plated copper heater. Both transient and steady measurements of surface heat flux and superheat were made with the quartz heater; only steady measurements were possible with the copper heater. R-113 was the fluid used; the velocity varied over the interval 4-16cm/sec; bulk liquid subcooling varied over 2-20°C; heat flux varied over 4-8W/cm2.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)481-503
Number of pages23
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume974
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Jun 5
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Weightlessness
Microgravity
Gravitation
Boiling liquids
Hot Temperature
Earth (planet)
Quartz
Buoyancy
Surface Tension
Liquids
Gold
Copper
Heat flux
Thermometers
Heat transfer
Viscosity of liquids
Viscosity
Fluids
Surface tension
Momentum

Keywords

  • Earth gravity
  • Flow boiling
  • Microgravity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Criteria for approximating certain microgravity flow boiling characteristics in Earth gravity. / Merte, Herman; Park, Jaeseok; Shultz, William W.; Keller, Robert B.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 974, 05.06.2002, p. 481-503.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{323e6d24db0e4e03b72f112507c84080,
title = "Criteria for approximating certain microgravity flow boiling characteristics in Earth gravity",
abstract = "The forces governing flow boiling, aside from system pressure, are buoyancy, liquid momentum, interfacial surface tensions, and liquid viscosity. Guidance for approximating certain aspects of the flow boiling process in microgravity can be obtained in Earth gravity research by the imposition of a liquid velocity parallel to a flat heater surface in the inverted position, horizontal, or nearly horizontal, by having buoyancy hold the heated liquid and vapor formed close to the heater surface. Bounds on the velocities of interest are obtained from several dimensionless numbers: a two-phase Richardson number, a two-phase Weber number, and a Bond number. For the fluid used in the experimental work here, liquid velocities in the range U = 5-10cm/sec are judged to be critical for changes in behavior of the flow boiling process. Experimental results are presented for flow boiling heat transfer, concentrating on orientations that provide the largest reductions in buoyancy parallel to the heater surface, varying ± 5 degrees from facing horizontal downward. Results are presented for velocity, orientation, and subcooling effects on nucleation, dryout, and heat transfer. Two different heater surfaces were used: a thin gold film on a polished quartz substrate, acting as a heater and resistance thermometer, and a gold-plated copper heater. Both transient and steady measurements of surface heat flux and superheat were made with the quartz heater; only steady measurements were possible with the copper heater. R-113 was the fluid used; the velocity varied over the interval 4-16cm/sec; bulk liquid subcooling varied over 2-20°C; heat flux varied over 4-8W/cm2.",
keywords = "Earth gravity, Flow boiling, Microgravity",
author = "Herman Merte and Jaeseok Park and Shultz, {William W.} and Keller, {Robert B.}",
year = "2002",
month = "6",
day = "5",
language = "English",
volume = "974",
pages = "481--503",
journal = "Annals of The Lyceum of Natural History of New York",
issn = "0890-6564",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Criteria for approximating certain microgravity flow boiling characteristics in Earth gravity

AU - Merte, Herman

AU - Park, Jaeseok

AU - Shultz, William W.

AU - Keller, Robert B.

PY - 2002/6/5

Y1 - 2002/6/5

N2 - The forces governing flow boiling, aside from system pressure, are buoyancy, liquid momentum, interfacial surface tensions, and liquid viscosity. Guidance for approximating certain aspects of the flow boiling process in microgravity can be obtained in Earth gravity research by the imposition of a liquid velocity parallel to a flat heater surface in the inverted position, horizontal, or nearly horizontal, by having buoyancy hold the heated liquid and vapor formed close to the heater surface. Bounds on the velocities of interest are obtained from several dimensionless numbers: a two-phase Richardson number, a two-phase Weber number, and a Bond number. For the fluid used in the experimental work here, liquid velocities in the range U = 5-10cm/sec are judged to be critical for changes in behavior of the flow boiling process. Experimental results are presented for flow boiling heat transfer, concentrating on orientations that provide the largest reductions in buoyancy parallel to the heater surface, varying ± 5 degrees from facing horizontal downward. Results are presented for velocity, orientation, and subcooling effects on nucleation, dryout, and heat transfer. Two different heater surfaces were used: a thin gold film on a polished quartz substrate, acting as a heater and resistance thermometer, and a gold-plated copper heater. Both transient and steady measurements of surface heat flux and superheat were made with the quartz heater; only steady measurements were possible with the copper heater. R-113 was the fluid used; the velocity varied over the interval 4-16cm/sec; bulk liquid subcooling varied over 2-20°C; heat flux varied over 4-8W/cm2.

AB - The forces governing flow boiling, aside from system pressure, are buoyancy, liquid momentum, interfacial surface tensions, and liquid viscosity. Guidance for approximating certain aspects of the flow boiling process in microgravity can be obtained in Earth gravity research by the imposition of a liquid velocity parallel to a flat heater surface in the inverted position, horizontal, or nearly horizontal, by having buoyancy hold the heated liquid and vapor formed close to the heater surface. Bounds on the velocities of interest are obtained from several dimensionless numbers: a two-phase Richardson number, a two-phase Weber number, and a Bond number. For the fluid used in the experimental work here, liquid velocities in the range U = 5-10cm/sec are judged to be critical for changes in behavior of the flow boiling process. Experimental results are presented for flow boiling heat transfer, concentrating on orientations that provide the largest reductions in buoyancy parallel to the heater surface, varying ± 5 degrees from facing horizontal downward. Results are presented for velocity, orientation, and subcooling effects on nucleation, dryout, and heat transfer. Two different heater surfaces were used: a thin gold film on a polished quartz substrate, acting as a heater and resistance thermometer, and a gold-plated copper heater. Both transient and steady measurements of surface heat flux and superheat were made with the quartz heater; only steady measurements were possible with the copper heater. R-113 was the fluid used; the velocity varied over the interval 4-16cm/sec; bulk liquid subcooling varied over 2-20°C; heat flux varied over 4-8W/cm2.

KW - Earth gravity

KW - Flow boiling

KW - Microgravity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037024606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037024606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12446343

AN - SCOPUS:0037024606

VL - 974

SP - 481

EP - 503

JO - Annals of The Lyceum of Natural History of New York

JF - Annals of The Lyceum of Natural History of New York

SN - 0890-6564

ER -