Cumulative radiation exposure dose of diagnostic imaging studies in breast cancer patients

J. S. Choi, C. H. Rim, Y. B. Kim, Dae-Sik Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Breast cancer is a common disease in radiation oncology. We evaluated the radiation dose received by breast cancer patients, an often-neglected concern. Materials and Methods: The total effective radiation dose in 101 breast cancer patients was calculated by summing the effective doses of individual diagnostic imaging tests from the first hospital visit to the initiation of radiotherapy. The effective dose from general radiography and computed tomography (CT) was estimated using tissue-weighting factors and dose-length products. The effective dose from isotopes (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate) was estimated from the radioactivity of each isotope using dose coefficients. The patient radiation exposures were analyzed using radiologic records in the Picture Archiving and Communication System. Results: The median duration from initial imaging to the initiation of radiotherapy was 4.5 months (range: 0.7-13.4 months). When comparing the average effective doses associated with each diagnostic modality, CT, positron emission tomography-CT, bone scanning and radiography occupied 64%, 21%, 10% and 5% of the total effective dose, respectively. Comparison of the total effective dose according to clinical factors (age, AJCC stage, T stage, N stage, operation method, and cancer location) by multivariate analysis revealed that only T stage was significantly correlated with the total effective dose (p = 0.004). The median total effective dose was 71.5 mSv (range: 11.9-131.9 mSv). Conclusion: The radiation dose received from diagnostic testing in breast cancer patients is not negligible. We need to systematically collect and manage the doses received by patients from medical procedures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)275-281
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Research
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Diagnostic Imaging
Breast Neoplasms
Radiation
Radiography
Isotopes
Radiotherapy
Tomography
Radiology Information Systems
Technetium Tc 99m Medronate
Radiation Oncology
Age Factors
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Thromboplastin
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Radioactivity
Multivariate Analysis
Radiation Exposure
Bone and Bones
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Cumulative dose
  • Effective dose
  • Radiation exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Cumulative radiation exposure dose of diagnostic imaging studies in breast cancer patients. / Choi, J. S.; Rim, C. H.; Kim, Y. B.; Yang, Dae-Sik.

In: International Journal of Radiation Research, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.01.2019, p. 275-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{db392d5a531941a5a5674034df8a8691,
title = "Cumulative radiation exposure dose of diagnostic imaging studies in breast cancer patients",
abstract = "Background: Breast cancer is a common disease in radiation oncology. We evaluated the radiation dose received by breast cancer patients, an often-neglected concern. Materials and Methods: The total effective radiation dose in 101 breast cancer patients was calculated by summing the effective doses of individual diagnostic imaging tests from the first hospital visit to the initiation of radiotherapy. The effective dose from general radiography and computed tomography (CT) was estimated using tissue-weighting factors and dose-length products. The effective dose from isotopes (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate) was estimated from the radioactivity of each isotope using dose coefficients. The patient radiation exposures were analyzed using radiologic records in the Picture Archiving and Communication System. Results: The median duration from initial imaging to the initiation of radiotherapy was 4.5 months (range: 0.7-13.4 months). When comparing the average effective doses associated with each diagnostic modality, CT, positron emission tomography-CT, bone scanning and radiography occupied 64{\%}, 21{\%}, 10{\%} and 5{\%} of the total effective dose, respectively. Comparison of the total effective dose according to clinical factors (age, AJCC stage, T stage, N stage, operation method, and cancer location) by multivariate analysis revealed that only T stage was significantly correlated with the total effective dose (p = 0.004). The median total effective dose was 71.5 mSv (range: 11.9-131.9 mSv). Conclusion: The radiation dose received from diagnostic testing in breast cancer patients is not negligible. We need to systematically collect and manage the doses received by patients from medical procedures.",
keywords = "Breast cancer, Cumulative dose, Effective dose, Radiation exposure",
author = "Choi, {J. S.} and Rim, {C. H.} and Kim, {Y. B.} and Dae-Sik Yang",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.18869/acadpub.ijrr.17.2.275",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "275--281",
journal = "Iranian Journal of Radiation Research",
issn = "1728-4554",
publisher = "Novin Medical Radiation Institute",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cumulative radiation exposure dose of diagnostic imaging studies in breast cancer patients

AU - Choi, J. S.

AU - Rim, C. H.

AU - Kim, Y. B.

AU - Yang, Dae-Sik

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Breast cancer is a common disease in radiation oncology. We evaluated the radiation dose received by breast cancer patients, an often-neglected concern. Materials and Methods: The total effective radiation dose in 101 breast cancer patients was calculated by summing the effective doses of individual diagnostic imaging tests from the first hospital visit to the initiation of radiotherapy. The effective dose from general radiography and computed tomography (CT) was estimated using tissue-weighting factors and dose-length products. The effective dose from isotopes (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate) was estimated from the radioactivity of each isotope using dose coefficients. The patient radiation exposures were analyzed using radiologic records in the Picture Archiving and Communication System. Results: The median duration from initial imaging to the initiation of radiotherapy was 4.5 months (range: 0.7-13.4 months). When comparing the average effective doses associated with each diagnostic modality, CT, positron emission tomography-CT, bone scanning and radiography occupied 64%, 21%, 10% and 5% of the total effective dose, respectively. Comparison of the total effective dose according to clinical factors (age, AJCC stage, T stage, N stage, operation method, and cancer location) by multivariate analysis revealed that only T stage was significantly correlated with the total effective dose (p = 0.004). The median total effective dose was 71.5 mSv (range: 11.9-131.9 mSv). Conclusion: The radiation dose received from diagnostic testing in breast cancer patients is not negligible. We need to systematically collect and manage the doses received by patients from medical procedures.

AB - Background: Breast cancer is a common disease in radiation oncology. We evaluated the radiation dose received by breast cancer patients, an often-neglected concern. Materials and Methods: The total effective radiation dose in 101 breast cancer patients was calculated by summing the effective doses of individual diagnostic imaging tests from the first hospital visit to the initiation of radiotherapy. The effective dose from general radiography and computed tomography (CT) was estimated using tissue-weighting factors and dose-length products. The effective dose from isotopes (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate) was estimated from the radioactivity of each isotope using dose coefficients. The patient radiation exposures were analyzed using radiologic records in the Picture Archiving and Communication System. Results: The median duration from initial imaging to the initiation of radiotherapy was 4.5 months (range: 0.7-13.4 months). When comparing the average effective doses associated with each diagnostic modality, CT, positron emission tomography-CT, bone scanning and radiography occupied 64%, 21%, 10% and 5% of the total effective dose, respectively. Comparison of the total effective dose according to clinical factors (age, AJCC stage, T stage, N stage, operation method, and cancer location) by multivariate analysis revealed that only T stage was significantly correlated with the total effective dose (p = 0.004). The median total effective dose was 71.5 mSv (range: 11.9-131.9 mSv). Conclusion: The radiation dose received from diagnostic testing in breast cancer patients is not negligible. We need to systematically collect and manage the doses received by patients from medical procedures.

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Cumulative dose

KW - Effective dose

KW - Radiation exposure

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85072251532&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85072251532&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.18869/acadpub.ijrr.17.2.275

DO - 10.18869/acadpub.ijrr.17.2.275

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 275

EP - 281

JO - Iranian Journal of Radiation Research

JF - Iranian Journal of Radiation Research

SN - 1728-4554

IS - 2

ER -