Curcumin-loaded biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds modified with gelatin using 3D printing technology for cartilage tissue engineering

Min Jeong Lee, Sung Eun Kim, Juri Park, Guk Young Ahn, Tae Hoon Yun, Inseong Choi, Hak Jun Kim, Sung Wook Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We described the curcumin-loaded biodegradable polyurethane (PU) scaffolds modified with gelatin based on three-dimensional (3D) printing technology for potential application of cartilage regeneration. The printing solution of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) triol (polyol) and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol was printed through a nozzle in dimethyl sulfoxide phase with or without gelatin. The weight ratio of HMDI against PCL triol was varied as 3, 5, and 7 in order to evaluate its effect on the mechanical properties and biodegradation rate. A higher ratio of HMDI resulted in higher mechanical properties and a lower biodegradation rate. The use of gelatin increased the mechanical properties, biodegradation rate, and curcumin release due to the surface cross-linking, nanoporous structure, and surface hydrophilicity of the scaffolds. In vitro study revealed that the released curcumin enhanced the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocyte. The 3D-printed biodegradable PU scaffold modified with gelatin should thus be considered as a potential candidate for cartilage regeneration.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPolymers for Advanced Technologies
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Curcumin
Polyurethanes
Cartilage
Gelatin
Biodegradation
Tissue engineering
Scaffolds
Printing
Mechanical properties
Dimethyl sulfoxide
Polyols
Hydrophilicity
Trifluoroethanol
Nozzles
Dimethyl Sulfoxide
1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate

Keywords

  • 3D printing
  • biodegradable polyurethane
  • cartilage regeneration
  • curcumin
  • scaffold

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Polymers and Plastics

Cite this

Curcumin-loaded biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds modified with gelatin using 3D printing technology for cartilage tissue engineering. / Lee, Min Jeong; Kim, Sung Eun; Park, Juri; Ahn, Guk Young; Yun, Tae Hoon; Choi, Inseong; Kim, Hak Jun; Choi, Sung Wook.

In: Polymers for Advanced Technologies, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Min Jeong ; Kim, Sung Eun ; Park, Juri ; Ahn, Guk Young ; Yun, Tae Hoon ; Choi, Inseong ; Kim, Hak Jun ; Choi, Sung Wook. / Curcumin-loaded biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds modified with gelatin using 3D printing technology for cartilage tissue engineering. In: Polymers for Advanced Technologies. 2019.
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