Customized cranioplasty implants using three-dimensional printers and polymethyl-methacrylate casting

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55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The prefabrication of customized cranioplastic implants has been introduced to overcome the diffculties of intra-operative implant molding. The authors present a new technique, which consists of the prefabrication of implant molds using three-dimensional (3D) printers and polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) casting. Methods: A total of 16 patients with large skull defects (>100 cm2) underwent cranioplasty between November 2009 and April 2011. For unilateral cranial defects, 3D images of the skull were obtained from preoperative axial 1-mm spiral computed tomography (CT) scans. The image of the im-plant was generated by a digital subtraction mirror-imaging process using the normal side of the cranium as a model. For bilateral cranial defects, precraniectomy routine spiral CT scan data were merged with postcraniectomy 3D CT images following a smoothing process. Prefabrication of the mold was performed by the 3D printer. Intraoperatively, the PMMA implant was created with the prefabricated mold, and ft into the cranial defect. Results: The median operation time was 184.36±26.07 minutes. Postoperative CT scans showed excellent restoration of the symmetrical con-tours and curvature of the cranium in all cases. The median follow-up period was 23 months (range, 14-28 months). Postoperative infection was developed in one case (6.2%) who had an open wound defect previously. Conclusion: Customized cranioplasty PMMA implants using 3D printer may be a useful technique for the reconstruction of various cranial defects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)541-546
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Korean Neurosurgical Society
Volume52
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Polymethyl Methacrylate
Skull
Fungi
Spiral Computed Tomography
Tomography
Wounds and Injuries
Infection
Three Dimensional Printing

Keywords

  • Computer-aided design
  • Decompressive craniectomy
  • Polymethylmethacrylate
  • Reconstructive surgical procedure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Customized cranioplasty implants using three-dimensional printers and polymethyl-methacrylate casting",
abstract = "Objective: The prefabrication of customized cranioplastic implants has been introduced to overcome the diffculties of intra-operative implant molding. The authors present a new technique, which consists of the prefabrication of implant molds using three-dimensional (3D) printers and polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) casting. Methods: A total of 16 patients with large skull defects (>100 cm2) underwent cranioplasty between November 2009 and April 2011. For unilateral cranial defects, 3D images of the skull were obtained from preoperative axial 1-mm spiral computed tomography (CT) scans. The image of the im-plant was generated by a digital subtraction mirror-imaging process using the normal side of the cranium as a model. For bilateral cranial defects, precraniectomy routine spiral CT scan data were merged with postcraniectomy 3D CT images following a smoothing process. Prefabrication of the mold was performed by the 3D printer. Intraoperatively, the PMMA implant was created with the prefabricated mold, and ft into the cranial defect. Results: The median operation time was 184.36±26.07 minutes. Postoperative CT scans showed excellent restoration of the symmetrical con-tours and curvature of the cranium in all cases. The median follow-up period was 23 months (range, 14-28 months). Postoperative infection was developed in one case (6.2{\%}) who had an open wound defect previously. Conclusion: Customized cranioplasty PMMA implants using 3D printer may be a useful technique for the reconstruction of various cranial defects.",
keywords = "Computer-aided design, Decompressive craniectomy, Polymethylmethacrylate, Reconstructive surgical procedure",
author = "Bum-Joon Kim and Hong, {Ki Sun} and Kyung-Jae Park and Dong-Hyuk Park and Chung, {Yong Gu} and Shin-Hyuk Kang",
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T1 - Customized cranioplasty implants using three-dimensional printers and polymethyl-methacrylate casting

AU - Kim, Bum-Joon

AU - Hong, Ki Sun

AU - Park, Kyung-Jae

AU - Park, Dong-Hyuk

AU - Chung, Yong Gu

AU - Kang, Shin-Hyuk

PY - 2012/12/1

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N2 - Objective: The prefabrication of customized cranioplastic implants has been introduced to overcome the diffculties of intra-operative implant molding. The authors present a new technique, which consists of the prefabrication of implant molds using three-dimensional (3D) printers and polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) casting. Methods: A total of 16 patients with large skull defects (>100 cm2) underwent cranioplasty between November 2009 and April 2011. For unilateral cranial defects, 3D images of the skull were obtained from preoperative axial 1-mm spiral computed tomography (CT) scans. The image of the im-plant was generated by a digital subtraction mirror-imaging process using the normal side of the cranium as a model. For bilateral cranial defects, precraniectomy routine spiral CT scan data were merged with postcraniectomy 3D CT images following a smoothing process. Prefabrication of the mold was performed by the 3D printer. Intraoperatively, the PMMA implant was created with the prefabricated mold, and ft into the cranial defect. Results: The median operation time was 184.36±26.07 minutes. Postoperative CT scans showed excellent restoration of the symmetrical con-tours and curvature of the cranium in all cases. The median follow-up period was 23 months (range, 14-28 months). Postoperative infection was developed in one case (6.2%) who had an open wound defect previously. Conclusion: Customized cranioplasty PMMA implants using 3D printer may be a useful technique for the reconstruction of various cranial defects.

AB - Objective: The prefabrication of customized cranioplastic implants has been introduced to overcome the diffculties of intra-operative implant molding. The authors present a new technique, which consists of the prefabrication of implant molds using three-dimensional (3D) printers and polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) casting. Methods: A total of 16 patients with large skull defects (>100 cm2) underwent cranioplasty between November 2009 and April 2011. For unilateral cranial defects, 3D images of the skull were obtained from preoperative axial 1-mm spiral computed tomography (CT) scans. The image of the im-plant was generated by a digital subtraction mirror-imaging process using the normal side of the cranium as a model. For bilateral cranial defects, precraniectomy routine spiral CT scan data were merged with postcraniectomy 3D CT images following a smoothing process. Prefabrication of the mold was performed by the 3D printer. Intraoperatively, the PMMA implant was created with the prefabricated mold, and ft into the cranial defect. Results: The median operation time was 184.36±26.07 minutes. Postoperative CT scans showed excellent restoration of the symmetrical con-tours and curvature of the cranium in all cases. The median follow-up period was 23 months (range, 14-28 months). Postoperative infection was developed in one case (6.2%) who had an open wound defect previously. Conclusion: Customized cranioplasty PMMA implants using 3D printer may be a useful technique for the reconstruction of various cranial defects.

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