Date palm waste biochars alter a soil respiration, microbial biomass carbon, and heavy metal mobility in contaminated mined soil

Mohammad I. Al-Wabel, Adel Rabie A. Usman, Abdullah S. Al-Farraj, Yong Sik Ok, Adel Abduljabbar, Abdulelah I. Al-Faraj, Abdelazeem S. Sallam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 30-day incubation experiment was conducted using a heavy metal-contaminated mined soil amended with date palm feedstock (FS) and its derivative biochars (BCs) at three pyrolysis temperatures of 300 (BC-300), 500 (BC-500), and 700 °C (BC-700) with different application rates (0.0, 5, 15, and 30 g kg−1) to investigate their short-term effects on soil respiration (CO2–C efflux), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), soil organic carbon (SOC), mobile fraction of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, and Fe), pH, and electrical conductivity (EC). The results showed that FS and BC-300 with increasing addition rate significantly reduced soil pH, whereas SOC, CO2–C efflux, and soil MBC were increased compared to the control. On the contrary, BC-500 and BC-700 increased soil pH at early stage of incubation and have small or no effects on SOC, CO2–C efflux, and MBC. Based on the results, the date palm biochars exhibited much lower cumulative CO2–C efflux than feedstock, even with low-temperature biochar, indicating that BCs have C sequestration potential. Applying BC-700 at 15 and 30 g kg−1 significantly reduced cumulative CO2–C efflux by 21.8 and 45.4% compared to the control, respectively. The incorporation of FS into contaminated soil significantly increased the mobile content of Cd and Mn, but decreased the mobile content of Cu. However, BC-300 significantly reduced the mobile content of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. It could be concluded that low-temperature biochar could be used as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal mobility in mining contaminated soil in addition to minimize soil CO2–C efflux.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalEnvironmental Geochemistry and Health
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2017 Apr 19
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

soil respiration
Heavy Metals
Heavy metals
Biomass
Carbon
heavy metal
Soils
carbon
biomass
soil
organic carbon
Feedstocks
Organic carbon
incubation
soil amendment
soil carbon
carbon sequestration
pyrolysis
electrical conductivity
contaminated soil

Keywords

  • CO–C efflux
  • Contamination
  • Microbial activity
  • Mining soil
  • Pyrolysis temperature
  • Toxic metals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Date palm waste biochars alter a soil respiration, microbial biomass carbon, and heavy metal mobility in contaminated mined soil. / Al-Wabel, Mohammad I.; Usman, Adel Rabie A.; Al-Farraj, Abdullah S.; Ok, Yong Sik; Abduljabbar, Adel; Al-Faraj, Abdulelah I.; Sallam, Abdelazeem S.

In: Environmental Geochemistry and Health, 19.04.2017, p. 1-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Al-Wabel, Mohammad I. ; Usman, Adel Rabie A. ; Al-Farraj, Abdullah S. ; Ok, Yong Sik ; Abduljabbar, Adel ; Al-Faraj, Abdulelah I. ; Sallam, Abdelazeem S. / Date palm waste biochars alter a soil respiration, microbial biomass carbon, and heavy metal mobility in contaminated mined soil. In: Environmental Geochemistry and Health. 2017 ; pp. 1-18.
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abstract = "A 30-day incubation experiment was conducted using a heavy metal-contaminated mined soil amended with date palm feedstock (FS) and its derivative biochars (BCs) at three pyrolysis temperatures of 300 (BC-300), 500 (BC-500), and 700 °C (BC-700) with different application rates (0.0, 5, 15, and 30 g kg−1) to investigate their short-term effects on soil respiration (CO2–C efflux), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), soil organic carbon (SOC), mobile fraction of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, and Fe), pH, and electrical conductivity (EC). The results showed that FS and BC-300 with increasing addition rate significantly reduced soil pH, whereas SOC, CO2–C efflux, and soil MBC were increased compared to the control. On the contrary, BC-500 and BC-700 increased soil pH at early stage of incubation and have small or no effects on SOC, CO2–C efflux, and MBC. Based on the results, the date palm biochars exhibited much lower cumulative CO2–C efflux than feedstock, even with low-temperature biochar, indicating that BCs have C sequestration potential. Applying BC-700 at 15 and 30 g kg−1 significantly reduced cumulative CO2–C efflux by 21.8 and 45.4{\%} compared to the control, respectively. The incorporation of FS into contaminated soil significantly increased the mobile content of Cd and Mn, but decreased the mobile content of Cu. However, BC-300 significantly reduced the mobile content of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. It could be concluded that low-temperature biochar could be used as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal mobility in mining contaminated soil in addition to minimize soil CO2–C efflux.",
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AU - Al-Wabel, Mohammad I.

AU - Usman, Adel Rabie A.

AU - Al-Farraj, Abdullah S.

AU - Ok, Yong Sik

AU - Abduljabbar, Adel

AU - Al-Faraj, Abdulelah I.

AU - Sallam, Abdelazeem S.

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KW - Pyrolysis temperature

KW - Toxic metals

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