Defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity

Geonyeop Lee, Gwangseok Yang, Ara Cho, Jeong Woo Han, Ji Hyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity (e.g., 33% improvement in NO2 sensing and 614% improvement in NH3 sensing). A conventional reactive ion etching system was used to introduce the defects in a controlled manner. The sensitivity of graphene-based chemical sensors increased with increasing defect density until the vacancy-dominant region was reached. In addition, the mechanism of gas sensing was systematically investigated via experiments and density functional theory calculations, which indicated that the vacancy defect is a major contributing factor to the enhanced sensitivity. This study revealed that defect engineering in graphene has significant potential for fabricating ultra-sensitive graphene chemical sensors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14198-14204
Number of pages7
JournalPhysical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Volume18
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Graphite
Chemical sensors
graphene
Defects
sensitivity
sensors
defects
Vacancies
Defect density
Reactive ion etching
Density functional theory
Gases
Ions
etching
engineering
density functional theory
gases
Experiments
ions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity. / Lee, Geonyeop; Yang, Gwangseok; Cho, Ara; Han, Jeong Woo; Kim, Ji Hyun.

In: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Vol. 18, No. 21, 2016, p. 14198-14204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Geonyeop ; Yang, Gwangseok ; Cho, Ara ; Han, Jeong Woo ; Kim, Ji Hyun. / Defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity. In: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics. 2016 ; Vol. 18, No. 21. pp. 14198-14204.
@article{730e5941c1464a048c7fb846be25b30a,
title = "Defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity",
abstract = "We report defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity (e.g., 33{\%} improvement in NO2 sensing and 614{\%} improvement in NH3 sensing). A conventional reactive ion etching system was used to introduce the defects in a controlled manner. The sensitivity of graphene-based chemical sensors increased with increasing defect density until the vacancy-dominant region was reached. In addition, the mechanism of gas sensing was systematically investigated via experiments and density functional theory calculations, which indicated that the vacancy defect is a major contributing factor to the enhanced sensitivity. This study revealed that defect engineering in graphene has significant potential for fabricating ultra-sensitive graphene chemical sensors.",
author = "Geonyeop Lee and Gwangseok Yang and Ara Cho and Han, {Jeong Woo} and Kim, {Ji Hyun}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1039/c5cp04422g",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "14198--14204",
journal = "Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics",
issn = "1463-9076",
publisher = "Royal Society of Chemistry",
number = "21",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity

AU - Lee, Geonyeop

AU - Yang, Gwangseok

AU - Cho, Ara

AU - Han, Jeong Woo

AU - Kim, Ji Hyun

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - We report defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity (e.g., 33% improvement in NO2 sensing and 614% improvement in NH3 sensing). A conventional reactive ion etching system was used to introduce the defects in a controlled manner. The sensitivity of graphene-based chemical sensors increased with increasing defect density until the vacancy-dominant region was reached. In addition, the mechanism of gas sensing was systematically investigated via experiments and density functional theory calculations, which indicated that the vacancy defect is a major contributing factor to the enhanced sensitivity. This study revealed that defect engineering in graphene has significant potential for fabricating ultra-sensitive graphene chemical sensors.

AB - We report defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity (e.g., 33% improvement in NO2 sensing and 614% improvement in NH3 sensing). A conventional reactive ion etching system was used to introduce the defects in a controlled manner. The sensitivity of graphene-based chemical sensors increased with increasing defect density until the vacancy-dominant region was reached. In addition, the mechanism of gas sensing was systematically investigated via experiments and density functional theory calculations, which indicated that the vacancy defect is a major contributing factor to the enhanced sensitivity. This study revealed that defect engineering in graphene has significant potential for fabricating ultra-sensitive graphene chemical sensors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84971261493&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84971261493&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1039/c5cp04422g

DO - 10.1039/c5cp04422g

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84971261493

VL - 18

SP - 14198

EP - 14204

JO - Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics

JF - Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics

SN - 1463-9076

IS - 21

ER -