Delays in depression treatment among Korean population

Myung Ki, Jong Woo Paik, Kyeong Sook Choi, Seung Ho Ryu, Changsu Han, Kangjoon Lee, Byung-Joo Ham, Hun Soo Chang, Eun Soo Won, Tae Youn Jun, Min-Soo Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Delays in mental health service utilization for patients with depression have been observed globally. To elucidate some aspects of delays, age-related associations with a series of variables representing different stages of mental health service use were studied concurrently. Methods: A total of 1,433 patients with depression participated in a nationwide Korean Depressive Patient Survey through the collaboration of 70 psychiatric clinics and hospitals. Using logistic and Poisson regression, we investigated whether there is variation in the associations by age. Results: Patients with depression in South Korea spent 3.4 years on average before starting a first depression treatment after the onset of depression, and 58% of them entered depression treatment in the first year of onset. Early onset appeared to lower the chance of "early depression treatment": e.g., adjusted odds ratio (OR)s for onset age of 40-54, 25-39 and <25 versus ≥55 were 0.65 (95% CI=0.44, 0.94), 0.36 (95% CI=0.16, 0.81) and 0.18 (95% CI=0.06, 0.48), respectively. In contrast, favorable associations of early onset with "self-recognition as depression" and "number of nonpsychiatric clinics attended" before visiting psychiatrist were found. Younger cohorts were associated with more positive attitudes toward all mental health utilization measures. Discussion: Delays in depression treatment are lengthy in South Korea. Those with early onset are more likely to have delayed depression treatment but are more willing to seek help from a psychiatrist once they sought for the treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)414-424
Number of pages11
JournalAsia-Pacific Psychiatry
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Depression
Population
Therapeutics
Republic of Korea
Mental Health Services
Psychiatry
Psychiatric Hospitals
Age of Onset
Mental Health
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio

Keywords

  • Age of onset
  • Depression
  • Duration of untreated depression
  • Mental health service
  • Self-recognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Ki, M., Paik, J. W., Choi, K. S., Ryu, S. H., Han, C., Lee, K., ... Lee, M-S. (2014). Delays in depression treatment among Korean population. Asia-Pacific Psychiatry, 6(4), 414-424. https://doi.org/10.1111/appy.12140

Delays in depression treatment among Korean population. / Ki, Myung; Paik, Jong Woo; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Ryu, Seung Ho; Han, Changsu; Lee, Kangjoon; Ham, Byung-Joo; Chang, Hun Soo; Won, Eun Soo; Jun, Tae Youn; Lee, Min-Soo.

In: Asia-Pacific Psychiatry, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 414-424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ki, M, Paik, JW, Choi, KS, Ryu, SH, Han, C, Lee, K, Ham, B-J, Chang, HS, Won, ES, Jun, TY & Lee, M-S 2014, 'Delays in depression treatment among Korean population', Asia-Pacific Psychiatry, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 414-424. https://doi.org/10.1111/appy.12140
Ki, Myung ; Paik, Jong Woo ; Choi, Kyeong Sook ; Ryu, Seung Ho ; Han, Changsu ; Lee, Kangjoon ; Ham, Byung-Joo ; Chang, Hun Soo ; Won, Eun Soo ; Jun, Tae Youn ; Lee, Min-Soo. / Delays in depression treatment among Korean population. In: Asia-Pacific Psychiatry. 2014 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 414-424.
@article{eaf74f9ae18a4b00be7c121f60fe4d24,
title = "Delays in depression treatment among Korean population",
abstract = "Introduction: Delays in mental health service utilization for patients with depression have been observed globally. To elucidate some aspects of delays, age-related associations with a series of variables representing different stages of mental health service use were studied concurrently. Methods: A total of 1,433 patients with depression participated in a nationwide Korean Depressive Patient Survey through the collaboration of 70 psychiatric clinics and hospitals. Using logistic and Poisson regression, we investigated whether there is variation in the associations by age. Results: Patients with depression in South Korea spent 3.4 years on average before starting a first depression treatment after the onset of depression, and 58{\%} of them entered depression treatment in the first year of onset. Early onset appeared to lower the chance of {"}early depression treatment{"}: e.g., adjusted odds ratio (OR)s for onset age of 40-54, 25-39 and <25 versus ≥55 were 0.65 (95{\%} CI=0.44, 0.94), 0.36 (95{\%} CI=0.16, 0.81) and 0.18 (95{\%} CI=0.06, 0.48), respectively. In contrast, favorable associations of early onset with {"}self-recognition as depression{"} and {"}number of nonpsychiatric clinics attended{"} before visiting psychiatrist were found. Younger cohorts were associated with more positive attitudes toward all mental health utilization measures. Discussion: Delays in depression treatment are lengthy in South Korea. Those with early onset are more likely to have delayed depression treatment but are more willing to seek help from a psychiatrist once they sought for the treatment.",
keywords = "Age of onset, Depression, Duration of untreated depression, Mental health service, Self-recognition",
author = "Myung Ki and Paik, {Jong Woo} and Choi, {Kyeong Sook} and Ryu, {Seung Ho} and Changsu Han and Kangjoon Lee and Byung-Joo Ham and Chang, {Hun Soo} and Won, {Eun Soo} and Jun, {Tae Youn} and Min-Soo Lee",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/appy.12140",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "414--424",
journal = "Asia-Pacific Psychiatry",
issn = "1758-5864",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Delays in depression treatment among Korean population

AU - Ki, Myung

AU - Paik, Jong Woo

AU - Choi, Kyeong Sook

AU - Ryu, Seung Ho

AU - Han, Changsu

AU - Lee, Kangjoon

AU - Ham, Byung-Joo

AU - Chang, Hun Soo

AU - Won, Eun Soo

AU - Jun, Tae Youn

AU - Lee, Min-Soo

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Introduction: Delays in mental health service utilization for patients with depression have been observed globally. To elucidate some aspects of delays, age-related associations with a series of variables representing different stages of mental health service use were studied concurrently. Methods: A total of 1,433 patients with depression participated in a nationwide Korean Depressive Patient Survey through the collaboration of 70 psychiatric clinics and hospitals. Using logistic and Poisson regression, we investigated whether there is variation in the associations by age. Results: Patients with depression in South Korea spent 3.4 years on average before starting a first depression treatment after the onset of depression, and 58% of them entered depression treatment in the first year of onset. Early onset appeared to lower the chance of "early depression treatment": e.g., adjusted odds ratio (OR)s for onset age of 40-54, 25-39 and <25 versus ≥55 were 0.65 (95% CI=0.44, 0.94), 0.36 (95% CI=0.16, 0.81) and 0.18 (95% CI=0.06, 0.48), respectively. In contrast, favorable associations of early onset with "self-recognition as depression" and "number of nonpsychiatric clinics attended" before visiting psychiatrist were found. Younger cohorts were associated with more positive attitudes toward all mental health utilization measures. Discussion: Delays in depression treatment are lengthy in South Korea. Those with early onset are more likely to have delayed depression treatment but are more willing to seek help from a psychiatrist once they sought for the treatment.

AB - Introduction: Delays in mental health service utilization for patients with depression have been observed globally. To elucidate some aspects of delays, age-related associations with a series of variables representing different stages of mental health service use were studied concurrently. Methods: A total of 1,433 patients with depression participated in a nationwide Korean Depressive Patient Survey through the collaboration of 70 psychiatric clinics and hospitals. Using logistic and Poisson regression, we investigated whether there is variation in the associations by age. Results: Patients with depression in South Korea spent 3.4 years on average before starting a first depression treatment after the onset of depression, and 58% of them entered depression treatment in the first year of onset. Early onset appeared to lower the chance of "early depression treatment": e.g., adjusted odds ratio (OR)s for onset age of 40-54, 25-39 and <25 versus ≥55 were 0.65 (95% CI=0.44, 0.94), 0.36 (95% CI=0.16, 0.81) and 0.18 (95% CI=0.06, 0.48), respectively. In contrast, favorable associations of early onset with "self-recognition as depression" and "number of nonpsychiatric clinics attended" before visiting psychiatrist were found. Younger cohorts were associated with more positive attitudes toward all mental health utilization measures. Discussion: Delays in depression treatment are lengthy in South Korea. Those with early onset are more likely to have delayed depression treatment but are more willing to seek help from a psychiatrist once they sought for the treatment.

KW - Age of onset

KW - Depression

KW - Duration of untreated depression

KW - Mental health service

KW - Self-recognition

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84911936897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84911936897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/appy.12140

DO - 10.1111/appy.12140

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 414

EP - 424

JO - Asia-Pacific Psychiatry

JF - Asia-Pacific Psychiatry

SN - 1758-5864

IS - 4

ER -