Density-dependent separation of encapsulated cells in a microfluidic channel by using a standing surface acoustic wave

Jeonghun Nam, Hyunjung Lim, Choong Kim, Ji Yoon Kang, Sehyun Shin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study presents a method for density-based separation of monodisperse encapsulated cells using a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) in a microchannel. Even though monodisperse polymer beads can be generated by the state-of-the-art technology in microfluidics, the quantity of encapsulated cells cannot be controlled precisely. In the present study, mono-disperse alginate beads in a laminar flow can be separated based on their density using acoustophoresis. A mixture of beads of equal sizes but dissimilar densities was hydrodynamically focused at the entrance and then actively driven toward the sidewalls by a SSAW. The lateral displacement of a bead is proportional to the density of the bead, i.e., the number of encapsulated cells in an alginate bead. Under optimized conditions, the recovery rate of a target bead group (large-cell-quantity alginate beads) reached up to 97% at a rate of 2300 beads per minute. A cell viability test also confirmed that the encapsulated cells were hardly damaged by the acoustic force. Moreover, cell-encapsulating beads that were cultured for 1 day were separated in a similar manner. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that a SSAW can successfully separate monodisperse particles by their density. With the present technique for separating cell-encapsulating beads, the current cell engineering technology can be significantly advanced.

Original languageEnglish
Article number024120
JournalBiomicrofluidics
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Apr 26

Fingerprint

Microfluidics
Cell Separation
Alginate
beads
Surface waves
Acoustic waves
acoustics
Cell engineering
cells
Engineering technology
Microchannels
Laminar flow
Polymers
Acoustics
Cells
Cell Engineering
Technology
encapsulating
Recovery
alginic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Density-dependent separation of encapsulated cells in a microfluidic channel by using a standing surface acoustic wave. / Nam, Jeonghun; Lim, Hyunjung; Kim, Choong; Yoon Kang, Ji; Shin, Sehyun.

In: Biomicrofluidics, Vol. 6, No. 2, 024120, 26.04.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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