Depression, social factors, and farmworker health care utilization

A. Georges, T. Alterman, S. Gabbard, J. G. Grzywacz, R. Shen, J. Nakamoto, D. J. Carroll, Carles Muntaner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Farmworkers frequently live in rural areas and experience high rates of depressive symptoms. This study examines the association between elevated depressive symptoms and health care utilization among Latino farmworkers. Methods: Data were obtained from 2,905 Latino farmworkers interviewed for the National Agricultural Workers Survey. Elevated depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression short-form. A dichotomous health care utilization variable was constructed from self-reported use of health care services in the United States. A categorical measure of provider type was constructed for those reporting use of health care. Results: Over 50% of farmworkers reported at least 1 health care visit in the United States during the past 2 years; most visits occurred in a private practice. The odds of reporting health care utilization in the United States were 45% higher among farmworkers with elevated depressive symptoms. Type of provider was not associated with depressive symptoms. Women were more likely to seek health care; education and family relationships were associated with health care utilization. Conclusions: Latino farmworkers who live and work in rural areas seek care from private practices or migrant/Community Health Clinics. Farmworkers with elevated depressive symptoms are more likely to access health care. Rural health care providers need to be prepared to recognize, screen, and treat mental health problems among Latino farmworkers. Outreach focused on protecting farmworker mental health may be useful in reducing health care utilization while improving farmworker quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Rural Health
Volume29
Issue numberSUPPL.1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Feb 26
Externally publishedYes

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Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Depression
Hispanic Americans
Delivery of Health Care
Private Practice
Mental Health
Farmers
Rural Health
Health Services Accessibility
Family Relations
Health Personnel
Health Services
Epidemiologic Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Georges, A., Alterman, T., Gabbard, S., Grzywacz, J. G., Shen, R., Nakamoto, J., ... Muntaner, C. (2013). Depression, social factors, and farmworker health care utilization. Journal of Rural Health, 29(SUPPL.1). https://doi.org/10.1111/jrh.12008

Depression, social factors, and farmworker health care utilization. / Georges, A.; Alterman, T.; Gabbard, S.; Grzywacz, J. G.; Shen, R.; Nakamoto, J.; Carroll, D. J.; Muntaner, Carles.

In: Journal of Rural Health, Vol. 29, No. SUPPL.1, 26.02.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Georges, A, Alterman, T, Gabbard, S, Grzywacz, JG, Shen, R, Nakamoto, J, Carroll, DJ & Muntaner, C 2013, 'Depression, social factors, and farmworker health care utilization', Journal of Rural Health, vol. 29, no. SUPPL.1. https://doi.org/10.1111/jrh.12008
Georges A, Alterman T, Gabbard S, Grzywacz JG, Shen R, Nakamoto J et al. Depression, social factors, and farmworker health care utilization. Journal of Rural Health. 2013 Feb 26;29(SUPPL.1). https://doi.org/10.1111/jrh.12008
Georges, A. ; Alterman, T. ; Gabbard, S. ; Grzywacz, J. G. ; Shen, R. ; Nakamoto, J. ; Carroll, D. J. ; Muntaner, Carles. / Depression, social factors, and farmworker health care utilization. In: Journal of Rural Health. 2013 ; Vol. 29, No. SUPPL.1.
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