Desvenlafaxine, a serotonin-norepinephrine uptake inhibitor for major depressive disorder, neuropathic pain and the vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause

C. U. Pae, M. H. Park, D. M. Marks, C. Han, A. A. Patkar, P. S. Masand

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Desvenlafaxine, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) developed by Wyeth, is a novel salt form of the isolated major active metabolite of the antidepressant venlafaxine. Desvenlafaxine was developed as a slow-release tablet formulation and rapidly penetrates the brain upon administration supporting its direct effects on neuronal systems of the brain. Unlike various other antidepressants including venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine is not metabolized by cytochrome p450 (CYP) enzyme pathways and is associated with minimal inhibition of CYP enzymes. This feature results in a comparatively low risk of drug-drug interaction and consistent intra-individual and inter-individual pharmacokinetic profiles. Desvenlafaxine has been recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) based on a series of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials indicating efficacy and safety for patients with MDD. Studies have also supported the potential utility of desvenlafaxine in the treatment of vasomotor symptoms of menopause, anxiety symptoms and painful physical symptoms. However, concerns including mixed efficacy and adverse events need to be further explored in future studies.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)75-90
    Number of pages16
    JournalCurrent Opinion in Investigational Drugs
    Volume10
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2009 Jan

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pharmacology
    • Drug Discovery

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