Detection of masked hypertension and the 'Mask Effect' in patients with well-controlled office blood pressure

Sung Ji Park, Jeong Bae Park, Dong Ju Choi, Ho Joong Youn, Chang Gyu Park, Young Keun Ahn, Joon Han Shin, Dong Woon Kim, Se Joong Rim, Jang Ho Bae, Hyun Young Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Masked hypertension (MH) is characterized by its hidden nature and poor prognosis. However, it is not practical to routinely recommend home or ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (HBP or AMBP) to all patients with apparently well-controlled BP. The purpose of this study is to present, within the group of patients with well-controlled office BP (OBP), the clinical predictors of MH and to evaluate the gap (ie, the 'mask effect' (ME)) between OBP and HBP. Methods and Results: BP was measured at the outpatient clinic and at home in 1,019 treated hypertensive patients. Candidate predictors for MH were analyzed within 511 patients with well-controlled OBP (45.6% men, 57.1±9.0 years). Among them, the prevalence of MH was 20.9% (n=107). In the multivariate-adjusted analysis, the risk of MH increased with high serum fasting blood glucose level (odds ratio (OR) 1.009, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.001-1.018, P=0.020), higher systolic OBP (OR 1.075, 95%CI 1.045-1.106, P<0.001), higher diastolic OBP (OR 1.045, 95%CI 1.007-1.084, P=0.019) and the number of antihypertensive medications (OR 1.320, 95%CI 1.113-1.804, P=0.021). Furthermore, systolic HBP correlated well with systolic OBP (r=0.351, P<0.001) and with the degree of systolic ME (r=-0.672, P<0.001). Conclusions: To recognize MH, it is practical to investigate those patients who are taking multiple antihypertensive drugs and have a high OBP with a high FBG level. The term "ME" identifies MH more appropriately than the term "negative white-coat effect".

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-365
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation Journal
Volume75
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Feb 1

Fingerprint

Masked Hypertension
Masks
Blood Pressure
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Antihypertensive Agents
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Multivariate Analysis

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Home monitoring
  • Masked hypertension
  • White-coat effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Detection of masked hypertension and the 'Mask Effect' in patients with well-controlled office blood pressure. / Park, Sung Ji; Park, Jeong Bae; Choi, Dong Ju; Youn, Ho Joong; Park, Chang Gyu; Ahn, Young Keun; Shin, Joon Han; Kim, Dong Woon; Rim, Se Joong; Bae, Jang Ho; Park, Hyun Young.

In: Circulation Journal, Vol. 75, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 357-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Park, SJ, Park, JB, Choi, DJ, Youn, HJ, Park, CG, Ahn, YK, Shin, JH, Kim, DW, Rim, SJ, Bae, JH & Park, HY 2011, 'Detection of masked hypertension and the 'Mask Effect' in patients with well-controlled office blood pressure', Circulation Journal, vol. 75, no. 2, pp. 357-365. https://doi.org/10.1253/circj.CJ-10-0492
Park, Sung Ji ; Park, Jeong Bae ; Choi, Dong Ju ; Youn, Ho Joong ; Park, Chang Gyu ; Ahn, Young Keun ; Shin, Joon Han ; Kim, Dong Woon ; Rim, Se Joong ; Bae, Jang Ho ; Park, Hyun Young. / Detection of masked hypertension and the 'Mask Effect' in patients with well-controlled office blood pressure. In: Circulation Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 75, No. 2. pp. 357-365.
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AU - Park, Chang Gyu

AU - Ahn, Young Keun

AU - Shin, Joon Han

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