Development of Protein-Based High-Oxygen Barrier Films Using an Industrial Manufacturing Facility

Yoonjee Chang, Eunmi Joo, Hong geon Song, Inyoung Choi, Chan Suk Yoon, Young Ju Choi, Jaejoon Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract: In this study, protein-based high-oxygen barrier multilayer films were manufactured at a pilot plant scale by a roll-to-roll coating process and an adhesive lamination process. Also, their characteristics were examined to evaluate their industrial feasibility. Oxygen transmission rates (OTRs) of the protein-based films (polyethylene terephthalate [PET]/pea protein isolate [PPI]/nylon/cast polypropylene [CPP], PET/whey protein isolate [WPI]/CPP, PET/WPI/nylon/CPP, and PET/PPI/nylon/low-density polyethylene [LDPE]) were significantly lower than OTR of the PET/nylon/CPP film without a protein-coating layer and that of the commercial high-barrier multilayer film copolymer (PET/aluminum/CPP). In addition, water vapor transmission rates of the films containing protein layer were significantly lower than that of the commercial high-barrier film containing ethylene vinyl alcohol [nylon/nylon/EVOH/easy peel layer [EPL]). Among the tested polymers, the PET/WPI/nylon/LDPE film showed the highest heat-sealing ability, tensile strength, and elastic modulus. Moreover, transparency and haze of the PET/WPI/nylon/CPP film were similar to the film without WPI coating. Taken together, our results indicate that the protein-based coating films showing high-oxygen and high-water barrier properties can be manufactured using industrial facilities and could replace commercial multilayer films based on synthetic materials. Practical Application: Oxygen barrier property is an important feature in food packaging materials. Therefore, protein-coated high-oxygen barrier multilayer films were manufactured at a pilot scale to verify the possibility of their mass production. Specifically, high-oxygen and high-moisture barrier coating was produced by pea and whey proteins. Finally, the protein-based multilayer films made by an industrial facility were confirmed to be able to replace current commercial films containing synthetic barrier materials.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Food Science
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Polyethylene Terephthalates
Nylons
films (materials)
manufacturing
Polypropylenes
Oxygen
oxygen
nylon
polypropylenes
whey protein isolate
Proteins
proteins
Peas
coatings
pea protein
Polyethylene
protein isolates
Food Packaging
Manufacturing and Industrial Facilities
Tensile Strength

Keywords

  • adhesive lamination process
  • multilayer films
  • pea protein
  • roll-to-roll coating process
  • whey protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Development of Protein-Based High-Oxygen Barrier Films Using an Industrial Manufacturing Facility. / Chang, Yoonjee; Joo, Eunmi; Song, Hong geon; Choi, Inyoung; Yoon, Chan Suk; Choi, Young Ju; Han, Jaejoon.

In: Journal of Food Science, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chang, Yoonjee ; Joo, Eunmi ; Song, Hong geon ; Choi, Inyoung ; Yoon, Chan Suk ; Choi, Young Ju ; Han, Jaejoon. / Development of Protein-Based High-Oxygen Barrier Films Using an Industrial Manufacturing Facility. In: Journal of Food Science. 2019.
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AB - Abstract: In this study, protein-based high-oxygen barrier multilayer films were manufactured at a pilot plant scale by a roll-to-roll coating process and an adhesive lamination process. Also, their characteristics were examined to evaluate their industrial feasibility. Oxygen transmission rates (OTRs) of the protein-based films (polyethylene terephthalate [PET]/pea protein isolate [PPI]/nylon/cast polypropylene [CPP], PET/whey protein isolate [WPI]/CPP, PET/WPI/nylon/CPP, and PET/PPI/nylon/low-density polyethylene [LDPE]) were significantly lower than OTR of the PET/nylon/CPP film without a protein-coating layer and that of the commercial high-barrier multilayer film copolymer (PET/aluminum/CPP). In addition, water vapor transmission rates of the films containing protein layer were significantly lower than that of the commercial high-barrier film containing ethylene vinyl alcohol [nylon/nylon/EVOH/easy peel layer [EPL]). Among the tested polymers, the PET/WPI/nylon/LDPE film showed the highest heat-sealing ability, tensile strength, and elastic modulus. Moreover, transparency and haze of the PET/WPI/nylon/CPP film were similar to the film without WPI coating. Taken together, our results indicate that the protein-based coating films showing high-oxygen and high-water barrier properties can be manufactured using industrial facilities and could replace commercial multilayer films based on synthetic materials. Practical Application: Oxygen barrier property is an important feature in food packaging materials. Therefore, protein-coated high-oxygen barrier multilayer films were manufactured at a pilot scale to verify the possibility of their mass production. Specifically, high-oxygen and high-moisture barrier coating was produced by pea and whey proteins. Finally, the protein-based multilayer films made by an industrial facility were confirmed to be able to replace current commercial films containing synthetic barrier materials.

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