Did you say susi or shushi? Measuring the emergence of robust fricative contrasts in English- and Japanese-acquiring children

Jeffrey Holliday, Mary E. Beckman, Chanelle Mays

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While the English fricatives /s/ and /f/ can be well-differentiated by the centroid frequency of the frication noise alone, the Japanese fricatives /s/ and /c/ cannot be. Measures of perceived spectral peak frequency and shape developed for stop bursts were adapted to describe sibilant fricative contrasts in English- and Japanese-speaking adults and children. These measures captured both the cross-language differences and more subtle inter-individual differences related to language-specific marking of gender. They could also be used in deriving a measure of robustness of contrast that captured cross-language differences in fricative development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages1886-1889
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes
Event11th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association: Spoken Language Processing for All, INTERSPEECH 2010 - Makuhari, Chiba, Japan
Duration: 2010 Sep 262010 Sep 30

Other

Other11th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association: Spoken Language Processing for All, INTERSPEECH 2010
CountryJapan
CityMakuhari, Chiba
Period10/9/2610/9/30

Fingerprint

Language
Individuality
Noise
Fricatives
Language Differences
Cross-language

Keywords

  • Acquisition
  • English
  • Gender marking
  • Japanese
  • Sibilant fricatives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Holliday, J., Beckman, M. E., & Mays, C. (2010). Did you say susi or shushi? Measuring the emergence of robust fricative contrasts in English- and Japanese-acquiring children. 1886-1889. Paper presented at 11th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association: Spoken Language Processing for All, INTERSPEECH 2010, Makuhari, Chiba, Japan.

Did you say susi or shushi? Measuring the emergence of robust fricative contrasts in English- and Japanese-acquiring children. / Holliday, Jeffrey; Beckman, Mary E.; Mays, Chanelle.

2010. 1886-1889 Paper presented at 11th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association: Spoken Language Processing for All, INTERSPEECH 2010, Makuhari, Chiba, Japan.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Holliday, J, Beckman, ME & Mays, C 2010, 'Did you say susi or shushi? Measuring the emergence of robust fricative contrasts in English- and Japanese-acquiring children' Paper presented at 11th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association: Spoken Language Processing for All, INTERSPEECH 2010, Makuhari, Chiba, Japan, 10/9/26 - 10/9/30, pp. 1886-1889.
Holliday J, Beckman ME, Mays C. Did you say susi or shushi? Measuring the emergence of robust fricative contrasts in English- and Japanese-acquiring children. 2010. Paper presented at 11th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association: Spoken Language Processing for All, INTERSPEECH 2010, Makuhari, Chiba, Japan.
Holliday, Jeffrey ; Beckman, Mary E. ; Mays, Chanelle. / Did you say susi or shushi? Measuring the emergence of robust fricative contrasts in English- and Japanese-acquiring children. Paper presented at 11th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association: Spoken Language Processing for All, INTERSPEECH 2010, Makuhari, Chiba, Japan.4 p.
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