Differences in neuroimaging features of early- versus late-onset nonfluent/agrammatic primary progressive aphasia

Jin San Lee, Sole Yoo, Seongbeom Park, Hee Jin Kim, Key Chung Park, Joon Kyung Seong, Mee Kyung Suh, Juyoun Lee, Hyemin Jang, Ko Woon Kim, Yeshin Kim, Soo Hyun Cho, Seung Joo Kim, Jun Pyo Kim, Young Hee Jung, Eun Joo Kim, Yeon Lim Suh, Samuel N. Lockhart, William W. Seeley, Duk L. NaSang Won Seo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigated distinct neuroimaging features measured by cortical thickness and subcortical structural shape abnormality in early-onset (EO, onset age <65 years) and late-onset (LO, onset age ≥65 years) nonfluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA) patients. Cortical thickness and subcortical structural shape analyses were performed using a surface-based method from 38 patients with nfvPPA and 76 cognitively normal individuals. To minimize the effects of physiological aging, we used W-scores in comparisons between the groups. The EO-nfvPPA group exhibited more extensive cortical thickness reductions predominantly in the left perisylvian, lateral and medial prefrontal, temporal, posterior cingulate, and precuneus regions than the LO-nfvPPA group. The EO-nfvPPA group also exhibited significantly greater subcortical structural shape abnormality than the LO-nfvPPA group, mainly in the left striatum, hippocampus, and amygdala. Our findings suggested that there were differences in neuroimaging features between these groups by the age of symptom onset, which might be explained by underlying heterogeneous neuropathological differences or the age-related brain reserve hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-101
Number of pages10
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume86
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Feb

Keywords

  • Age of symptom onset
  • Brain reserve hypothesis
  • Frontotemporal dementia
  • Nonfluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Ageing
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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  • Cite this

    San Lee, J., Yoo, S., Park, S., Kim, H. J., Park, K. C., Seong, J. K., Suh, M. K., Lee, J., Jang, H., Kim, K. W., Kim, Y., Cho, S. H., Kim, S. J., Kim, J. P., Jung, Y. H., Kim, E. J., Suh, Y. L., Lockhart, S. N., Seeley, W. W., ... Seo, S. W. (2020). Differences in neuroimaging features of early- versus late-onset nonfluent/agrammatic primary progressive aphasia. Neurobiology of Aging, 86, 92-101. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2019.10.011