Differences in the prevalence of colorectal polyps in patients undergoing endoscopic removal of gastric adenoma or early gastric cancer and in healthy individuals

Moon Kyung Joo, Jong Jae Park, W. W. Lee, Beomjae Lee, J. K. Hwang, S. H. Kim, W. Jung, J. H. Kim, Jong Eun Yeon, Jae Seon Kim, Kwan Soo Byun, Young-Tae Bak

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and aims: We compared the prevalence of adenomatous and cancerous colon polyps in patients who underwent endoscopic removal of gastric neoplasms and in healthy controls. Materials and methods: This retrospective study reviewed the medical records of 186 patients with gastric neoplasms and 186 healthy subjects from January 2002 to October 2008. The gastric neoplasm group was comprised of patients undergoing endoscopic removal of gastric adenomas or early gastric cancers and serial fiberoptic colonoscopy (FCS) for checkups. The control group was comprised of subjects undergoing fiberoptic esophagogastroduodenoscopy (FEGD) and FCS for general checkup and was matched for age and sex with the gastric neoplasm group. Advanced colonic neoplasm was defined by any of the following: (1) the presence of three or more polyps; (2) polyp size at least 1.0cm; (3) high-grade dysplasia or adenocarcinoma confirmed by histopathologic examination. Results: Of the 372 persons, colorectal polyps were detected in 124 (33.3%), advanced colonic neoplasms in 44 (11.8%), and adenocarcinomas in 10 (2.7%). The overall prevalence of adenomatous or cancerous polyps (all polyps) and the prevalence of advanced colonic neoplasms were significantly higher in the gastric neoplasm group than in the control group (all polyps: 40.9% in the gastric neoplasm group vs. 25.8% in the control group, P=0.002; advanced colonic neoplasms: 15.6% vs. 8.1%, P=0.025). The risk factors for all polyps were age, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and being assigned to the gastric neoplasm group, and those for advanced colonic neoplasms were age and being assigned to the gastric neoplasm group. Confining the analysis to the gastric neoplasm group, the risk factors for all polyps were identical with those for the total group; however, those for advanced colonic neoplasm were different (age vs. diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia). Conclusion: Endoscopists should consider performing routine FCS in patients undergoing endoscopic removal of gastric neoplasms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)114-120
Number of pages7
JournalEndoscopy
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Feb 16

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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