Differential gene expression in pancreatic tissues of streptozocin-induced diabetic rats and genetically-diabetic mice in response to hypoglycemic dipeptide cyclo (His-Pro) treatment

Song Ah Choi, Hyung Joo Suh, Jong Won Yun, Jang Won Choi

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Diabetic studies are mostly interested in gene expression in the pancreas, the site of insulin secretion that regulates blood glucose levels. However, a single gene approach has been ruled out for many years in discovering new genes or the molecular networks involved in the induction process of diabetes. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which cyclo (His-Pro) (CHP) affects amelioration of diabetes mellitus, we performed gene expression profiling in the pancreatic tissues of two diabetic animal models, streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats (T1DM) and genetically-diabetic (C57BL/6J ob/ob) mice (T2DM). To understand the healing process of these diabetic rodents, we examined the effects of CHP on various gene expression in pancreatic tissues of both animal models. Our microarray analysis revealed that a total of 1,175 genes were down-regulated and 629 genes were up-regulated in response to STZ treatment, and the altered expression levels of numerous genes were restored to normal state upon CHP treatment. In particular, 476 genes showed significantly altered gene expression upon CHP treatment. In a functional classification, 7,198 genes were counted as differentially expressed in pancreatic tissues of STZ- and CHP-treated rats compared with control, whereas 1,534 genes were restored to normal states by CHP treatment. Microarray data demonstrated for the first time that overexpression of the genes encoding IL-1 receptor, lipid metabolic enzymes (e.g. Mte1, Ptdss1, and Sult2a1), myo-inositol oxygenase, glucagon, and somatostatin as well as down-regulation of olfactory receptor 984 and mitochondrial ribosomal protein, which are highly linked to T1DM etiology. In genetically-diabetic mice, 4,384 genes were altered in gene expression by more than 2-fold compared to the control mice, when counted differentially expressed. In genetically-diabetic mice, 4,384 genes altered in expression by higher than 2-fold were counted as differentially expressed genes in pancreatic tissues of CHP-treated mice. On the other hand, 2,140 genes were up-regulated and 2,244 genes were down-regulated by CHP treatment. The results of the microarray analysis revealed that up-regulation of IL-2, IL12a, and leptin receptor and down-regulation of PIK3 played important physiological roles in the onset of T2DM. In conclusion, we hypothesize that CHP accelerates alterations of gene expression in ameliorating diabetes and antagonizes those that induces the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8821-8835
Number of pages15
JournalMolecular Biology Reports
Volume39
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Sep 1

Fingerprint

Dipeptides
Streptozocin
Hypoglycemic Agents
Gene Expression
Genes
Microarray Analysis
histidyl-proline diketopiperazine
Inositol Oxygenase
Down-Regulation
Animal Models
Odorant Receptors
Leptin Receptors
Interleukin-1 Receptors
Interleukin-2 Receptors
Ribosomal Proteins
Mitochondrial Proteins
Gene Expression Profiling
Somatostatin
Glucagon
Blood Glucose

Keywords

  • Cyclo (His-Pro)
  • Diabetes
  • Microarray array
  • Ob/ob mice
  • Pancreatic gene expression
  • STZ-induced diabetic rats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

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title = "Differential gene expression in pancreatic tissues of streptozocin-induced diabetic rats and genetically-diabetic mice in response to hypoglycemic dipeptide cyclo (His-Pro) treatment",
abstract = "Diabetic studies are mostly interested in gene expression in the pancreas, the site of insulin secretion that regulates blood glucose levels. However, a single gene approach has been ruled out for many years in discovering new genes or the molecular networks involved in the induction process of diabetes. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which cyclo (His-Pro) (CHP) affects amelioration of diabetes mellitus, we performed gene expression profiling in the pancreatic tissues of two diabetic animal models, streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats (T1DM) and genetically-diabetic (C57BL/6J ob/ob) mice (T2DM). To understand the healing process of these diabetic rodents, we examined the effects of CHP on various gene expression in pancreatic tissues of both animal models. Our microarray analysis revealed that a total of 1,175 genes were down-regulated and 629 genes were up-regulated in response to STZ treatment, and the altered expression levels of numerous genes were restored to normal state upon CHP treatment. In particular, 476 genes showed significantly altered gene expression upon CHP treatment. In a functional classification, 7,198 genes were counted as differentially expressed in pancreatic tissues of STZ- and CHP-treated rats compared with control, whereas 1,534 genes were restored to normal states by CHP treatment. Microarray data demonstrated for the first time that overexpression of the genes encoding IL-1 receptor, lipid metabolic enzymes (e.g. Mte1, Ptdss1, and Sult2a1), myo-inositol oxygenase, glucagon, and somatostatin as well as down-regulation of olfactory receptor 984 and mitochondrial ribosomal protein, which are highly linked to T1DM etiology. In genetically-diabetic mice, 4,384 genes were altered in gene expression by more than 2-fold compared to the control mice, when counted differentially expressed. In genetically-diabetic mice, 4,384 genes altered in expression by higher than 2-fold were counted as differentially expressed genes in pancreatic tissues of CHP-treated mice. On the other hand, 2,140 genes were up-regulated and 2,244 genes were down-regulated by CHP treatment. The results of the microarray analysis revealed that up-regulation of IL-2, IL12a, and leptin receptor and down-regulation of PIK3 played important physiological roles in the onset of T2DM. In conclusion, we hypothesize that CHP accelerates alterations of gene expression in ameliorating diabetes and antagonizes those that induces the disease.",
keywords = "Cyclo (His-Pro), Diabetes, Microarray array, Ob/ob mice, Pancreatic gene expression, STZ-induced diabetic rats",
author = "Choi, {Song Ah} and Suh, {Hyung Joo} and Yun, {Jong Won} and Choi, {Jang Won}",
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T1 - Differential gene expression in pancreatic tissues of streptozocin-induced diabetic rats and genetically-diabetic mice in response to hypoglycemic dipeptide cyclo (His-Pro) treatment

AU - Choi, Song Ah

AU - Suh, Hyung Joo

AU - Yun, Jong Won

AU - Choi, Jang Won

PY - 2012/9/1

Y1 - 2012/9/1

N2 - Diabetic studies are mostly interested in gene expression in the pancreas, the site of insulin secretion that regulates blood glucose levels. However, a single gene approach has been ruled out for many years in discovering new genes or the molecular networks involved in the induction process of diabetes. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which cyclo (His-Pro) (CHP) affects amelioration of diabetes mellitus, we performed gene expression profiling in the pancreatic tissues of two diabetic animal models, streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats (T1DM) and genetically-diabetic (C57BL/6J ob/ob) mice (T2DM). To understand the healing process of these diabetic rodents, we examined the effects of CHP on various gene expression in pancreatic tissues of both animal models. Our microarray analysis revealed that a total of 1,175 genes were down-regulated and 629 genes were up-regulated in response to STZ treatment, and the altered expression levels of numerous genes were restored to normal state upon CHP treatment. In particular, 476 genes showed significantly altered gene expression upon CHP treatment. In a functional classification, 7,198 genes were counted as differentially expressed in pancreatic tissues of STZ- and CHP-treated rats compared with control, whereas 1,534 genes were restored to normal states by CHP treatment. Microarray data demonstrated for the first time that overexpression of the genes encoding IL-1 receptor, lipid metabolic enzymes (e.g. Mte1, Ptdss1, and Sult2a1), myo-inositol oxygenase, glucagon, and somatostatin as well as down-regulation of olfactory receptor 984 and mitochondrial ribosomal protein, which are highly linked to T1DM etiology. In genetically-diabetic mice, 4,384 genes were altered in gene expression by more than 2-fold compared to the control mice, when counted differentially expressed. In genetically-diabetic mice, 4,384 genes altered in expression by higher than 2-fold were counted as differentially expressed genes in pancreatic tissues of CHP-treated mice. On the other hand, 2,140 genes were up-regulated and 2,244 genes were down-regulated by CHP treatment. The results of the microarray analysis revealed that up-regulation of IL-2, IL12a, and leptin receptor and down-regulation of PIK3 played important physiological roles in the onset of T2DM. In conclusion, we hypothesize that CHP accelerates alterations of gene expression in ameliorating diabetes and antagonizes those that induces the disease.

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KW - Cyclo (His-Pro)

KW - Diabetes

KW - Microarray array

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KW - Pancreatic gene expression

KW - STZ-induced diabetic rats

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