Differential suppression of heat-killed lactobacilli isolated from kimchi, a Korean traditional food, on airway hyper-responsiveness in mice

Hye Jin Hong, Eugene Kim, Daeho Cho, Tae Sung Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: Probiotics have been shown to be effective in reducing allergic symptoms. However, there are few studies to evaluate the therapeutic effects of lactobacilli on allergen-induced airway inflammation. Objective: We investigated whether three heat-killed lactobacilli, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus curvatus and Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei, isolated from kimchi, exerted inhibitory effects on airway hyper-responsiveness in a murine asthma model. Methods: Heat-killed lactic acid bacteria were orally administered into BALB/c mice, followed by challenge with aerosolized ovalbumin, after which allergic symptoms were evaluated. Results: Airway inflammation was suppressed in the L. plantarum- and L. curvatus-treated mice. Interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 levels were significantly lower in the L. plantarum- and L. curvatus-treated mice than in those treated with L. sakei subsp. sakei. Importantly, heat-killed L. plantarum administration induced Foxp3 expression in intestinal lamina propria cells, and heat-killed L. curvatus induced IL-10 as a way of inducing tolerance. Conclusion: Specific strains of lactobacilli isolated from kimchi can effectively suppress airway hyper-responsiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)449-458
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Immunology
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 May

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Kimchi
  • Mice
  • Tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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