Dimensions of the psychosocial work environment in a sample of the US metropolitan population

Carles Muntaner, W. W. Eaton, R. Garrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study investigates the dimensional structure of the psychosocial work environment as assessed by Karasek's job characteristics scales and a set of factorial scales derived from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) observers' ratings of occupational characteristics for census occupations. Scale scores on the Karasek and DOT were linked to information on occupation from the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) study sample. Scale intercorrelations and factor analysis were performed on those ECA subjects who reported ever having a full-time job (n = 11,789). DOT's Substantive Complexity scale was positively correlated with Karasek's Skill Discretion and Decision Authority scales, and DOT's Physical Demands and Hazards scale was positively correlated with Karasek's Physical Demands scale. In addition, the DOT system compared to the Karasek system seems to assess psychosocial work domains less characteristic of traditional industrial jobs (interpersonal stress, expressive work). The content validity of the Karasek scales might be increased with the assessment of these domains. Giving support to Karasek's Demand/Control Model, the factor structure of the psychosocial work environment in the probability sample of five US metropolitan populations yielded two major dimensions: Control, and Physical Demands.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-363
Number of pages13
JournalWork and Stress
Volume7
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1993 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes

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Occupations
Population
Sampling Studies
Censuses
Statistical Factor Analysis
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Dimensions of the psychosocial work environment in a sample of the US metropolitan population. / Muntaner, Carles; Eaton, W. W.; Garrison, R.

In: Work and Stress, Vol. 7, No. 4, 01.12.1993, p. 351-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muntaner, C, Eaton, WW & Garrison, R 1993, 'Dimensions of the psychosocial work environment in a sample of the US metropolitan population', Work and Stress, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 351-363.
Muntaner, Carles ; Eaton, W. W. ; Garrison, R. / Dimensions of the psychosocial work environment in a sample of the US metropolitan population. In: Work and Stress. 1993 ; Vol. 7, No. 4. pp. 351-363.
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