Direct and Mediating Effects of Information Efficacy on Voting Behavior: Political Socialization of Young Adults in the 2012 U.S. Presidential Election

Sidharth Muralidharan, Youngjun Sung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to explore how young voters form attitudes through the socialization process (i.e., political information efficacy) and the factors that potentially shaped voting behavior in the 2012 U.S. presidential election. Using political socialization as the theoretical framework, 363 respondents were surveyed the day after the election. Findings indicate that biological sex, election news, and peer communication had a direct impact on information efficacy for young voters. Information efficacy had a significant direct impact on voting behavior and a mediating effect via socialization agents. Implications for campaign planners are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-114
Number of pages15
JournalCommunication Reports
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 May 3

Fingerprint

political socialization
voting behavior
presidential election
young adult
socialization
Communication
election
news
campaign
communication
Young Adults
Presidential Elections
Voting Behavior
Political Socialization
Efficacy
Voters
Elections
Socialization

Keywords

  • Political Information Efficacy
  • Political Socialization
  • Voting Behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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