Direct role of adiponectin and adiponectin receptors in endometrial cancer: In vitro and ex vivo studies in humans

Hyun Seuk Moon, John P. Chamberland, Konstantinos Aronis, Sofia Tseleni-Balafouta, Christos S. Mantzoros

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Low adiponectin levels are an independent risk factor for and mediate the effect of obesity on endometrial cancer in epidemiology studies. The direct or indirect mechanisms underlying these findings remain to be elucidated. We first examined the expression of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) and 2 (AdipoR2) in normal human endometrium and in endometrial cancer tissues ex vivo. We then used KLE and RL95-2 human endometrial cancer cell lines in vitro to study relative expression of AdipoRs, to investigate the effect of adiponectin on activating intracellular signaling pathways, and to assess its potential to alter malignant properties. We report for the first time that the relative expression level of AdipoR1 is higher than AdipoR2 in human endometrial cancer tissue, but the expression of AdipoRs is not statistically different from nonneoplastic tissues. We also show for the first time in endometrial cancer cell lines in vitro that adiponectin suppresses endometrial cancer proliferation acting through AdipoRs. Adiponectin also increases the expression of the adaptor molecule LKB1, which is required for adiponectin-mediated activation of AMPK/S6 axis and modulation of cell proliferation, colony formation, adhesion, and invasion of KLE and RL95-2 cell lines. These novel mechanistic studies provide for the first time in vitro and ex vivo evidence for a causal role of adiponectin in endometrial cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2234-2243
Number of pages10
JournalMolecular cancer therapeutics
Volume10
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Dec

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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