Disparities in bystander CPR provision and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest according to neighborhood ethnicity

Sungwoo Moon, Bentley J. Bobrow, Tyler F. Vadeboncoeur, Wesley Kortuem, Marvis Kisakye, Comilla Sasson, Uwe Stolz, Daniel W. Spaite

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study objective: We aimed to determine if there are differences in bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCPR) provision and survival to hospital discharge from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) occurring in Hispanic neighborhoods in Arizona. Methods: We analyzed a prospectively collected, state wide Utstein-compliant OHCA database between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Cases of OHCA were geocoded to determine their census tract of event location, and their neighborhood main ethnicity was assigned using census data. Neighborhoods were classified as "Hispanic" or "non-Hispanic white" when the percentage of residents in the census tract was 80% or more. Results: Among the 6637 geocoded adult OHCA victims during the study period, 4821 cases were included in this analysis, after excluding 1816 cases due to incident location, traumatic cause, or because the arrest occurred after emergency medical service arrival. In OHCAs occurring at Hispanic neighborhoods as compared with non- Hispanic white neighborhoods, the provision of BCPR (28.6% vs 43.8%; P < .001) and initially monitored shockable rhythm (17.3% vs 25.7%; P <.006) was significantly less frequent. Survival to hospital discharge was significantly lower in Hispanic neighborhoods than in non-Hispanic white neighborhoods (4.9% vs 10.8%; P = .013). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of Hispanic neighborhood for BCPR provision (OR, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.44-0.89) was lower as compared with non-Hispanic white neighborhoods. Conclusions: In Arizona, OHCA patients in Hispanic neighborhoods received BCPR less frequently and had a lower survival to hospital discharge rate than those in non-Hispanic white neighborhoods. Public health efforts to attenuate this disparity are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1041-1045
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume32
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Hispanic Americans
Censuses
Geographic Mapping
Survival
Odds Ratio
Emergency Medical Services
Public Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Disparities in bystander CPR provision and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest according to neighborhood ethnicity. / Moon, Sungwoo; Bobrow, Bentley J.; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler F.; Kortuem, Wesley; Kisakye, Marvis; Sasson, Comilla; Stolz, Uwe; Spaite, Daniel W.

In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 32, No. 9, 01.01.2014, p. 1041-1045.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moon, Sungwoo ; Bobrow, Bentley J. ; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler F. ; Kortuem, Wesley ; Kisakye, Marvis ; Sasson, Comilla ; Stolz, Uwe ; Spaite, Daniel W. / Disparities in bystander CPR provision and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest according to neighborhood ethnicity. In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 32, No. 9. pp. 1041-1045.
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abstract = "Study objective: We aimed to determine if there are differences in bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCPR) provision and survival to hospital discharge from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) occurring in Hispanic neighborhoods in Arizona. Methods: We analyzed a prospectively collected, state wide Utstein-compliant OHCA database between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Cases of OHCA were geocoded to determine their census tract of event location, and their neighborhood main ethnicity was assigned using census data. Neighborhoods were classified as {"}Hispanic{"} or {"}non-Hispanic white{"} when the percentage of residents in the census tract was 80{\%} or more. Results: Among the 6637 geocoded adult OHCA victims during the study period, 4821 cases were included in this analysis, after excluding 1816 cases due to incident location, traumatic cause, or because the arrest occurred after emergency medical service arrival. In OHCAs occurring at Hispanic neighborhoods as compared with non- Hispanic white neighborhoods, the provision of BCPR (28.6{\%} vs 43.8{\%}; P < .001) and initially monitored shockable rhythm (17.3{\%} vs 25.7{\%}; P <.006) was significantly less frequent. Survival to hospital discharge was significantly lower in Hispanic neighborhoods than in non-Hispanic white neighborhoods (4.9{\%} vs 10.8{\%}; P = .013). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of Hispanic neighborhood for BCPR provision (OR, 0.62; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.44-0.89) was lower as compared with non-Hispanic white neighborhoods. Conclusions: In Arizona, OHCA patients in Hispanic neighborhoods received BCPR less frequently and had a lower survival to hospital discharge rate than those in non-Hispanic white neighborhoods. Public health efforts to attenuate this disparity are needed.",
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AU - Kortuem, Wesley

AU - Kisakye, Marvis

AU - Sasson, Comilla

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AB - Study objective: We aimed to determine if there are differences in bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCPR) provision and survival to hospital discharge from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) occurring in Hispanic neighborhoods in Arizona. Methods: We analyzed a prospectively collected, state wide Utstein-compliant OHCA database between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Cases of OHCA were geocoded to determine their census tract of event location, and their neighborhood main ethnicity was assigned using census data. Neighborhoods were classified as "Hispanic" or "non-Hispanic white" when the percentage of residents in the census tract was 80% or more. Results: Among the 6637 geocoded adult OHCA victims during the study period, 4821 cases were included in this analysis, after excluding 1816 cases due to incident location, traumatic cause, or because the arrest occurred after emergency medical service arrival. In OHCAs occurring at Hispanic neighborhoods as compared with non- Hispanic white neighborhoods, the provision of BCPR (28.6% vs 43.8%; P < .001) and initially monitored shockable rhythm (17.3% vs 25.7%; P <.006) was significantly less frequent. Survival to hospital discharge was significantly lower in Hispanic neighborhoods than in non-Hispanic white neighborhoods (4.9% vs 10.8%; P = .013). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of Hispanic neighborhood for BCPR provision (OR, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.44-0.89) was lower as compared with non-Hispanic white neighborhoods. Conclusions: In Arizona, OHCA patients in Hispanic neighborhoods received BCPR less frequently and had a lower survival to hospital discharge rate than those in non-Hispanic white neighborhoods. Public health efforts to attenuate this disparity are needed.

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