Disruption of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored lipid transfer protein gene altered cuticular lipid composition, increased plastoglobules, and enhanced susceptibility to infection by the fungal pathogen alternaria brassicicola

Saet Buyl Lee, Young Sam Go, Hyun Jong Bae, Jong Ho Park, Sung Ho Cho, Hong Joo Cho, Dong Sook Lee, Ohkmae Kim, Inhwan Hwang, Mi Chung Suh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

All aerial parts of vascular plants are covered with cuticular waxes, which are synthesized by extensive export of intracellular lipids from epidermal cells to the surface. Although it has been suggested that plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are involved in cuticular lipid transport, the in planta evidence is still not clear. In this study, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol- anchored LTP (LTPG1) showing higher expression in epidermal peels of stems than in stems was identified from an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome-wide microarray analysis. The expression of LTPG1 was observed in various tissues, including the epidermis, stem cortex, vascular bundles, mesophyll cells, root tips, pollen, and early-developing seeds. LTPG1 was found to be localized in the plasma membrane. Disruption of the LTPG1 gene caused alterations of cuticular lipid composition, but no significant changes on total wax and cutin monomer loads were seen. The largest reduction (10 mass %) in the ltpg1 mutant was observed in the C29 alkane, which is the major component of cuticular waxes in the stems and siliques. The reduced content was overcome by increases of the C29 secondary alcohols and C29 ketone wax loads. The ultrastructure analysis of ltpg1 showed a more diffuse cuticular layer structure, protrusions of the cytoplasm into the vacuole in the epidermis, and an increase of plastoglobules in the stem cortex and leaf mesophyll cells. Furthermore, the ltpg1 mutant was more susceptible to infection by the fungus Alternaria brassicicola than the wild type. Taken together, these results indicated that LTPG1 contributed either directly or indirectly to cuticular lipid accumulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)42-54
Number of pages13
JournalPlant Physiology
Volume150
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 May 1

Fingerprint

Alternaria brassicicola
Alternaria
Glycosylphosphatidylinositols
Mycoses
Waxes
lipid composition
Mesophyll Cells
Lipids
stems
pathogens
Arabidopsis
Epidermis
infection
epicuticular wax
Genes
Blood Vessels
epidermis (plant)
genes
waxes
mesophyll

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Genetics
  • Physiology

Cite this

Disruption of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored lipid transfer protein gene altered cuticular lipid composition, increased plastoglobules, and enhanced susceptibility to infection by the fungal pathogen alternaria brassicicola. / Lee, Saet Buyl; Go, Young Sam; Bae, Hyun Jong; Park, Jong Ho; Cho, Sung Ho; Cho, Hong Joo; Lee, Dong Sook; Kim, Ohkmae; Hwang, Inhwan; Suh, Mi Chung.

In: Plant Physiology, Vol. 150, No. 1, 01.05.2009, p. 42-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Saet Buyl ; Go, Young Sam ; Bae, Hyun Jong ; Park, Jong Ho ; Cho, Sung Ho ; Cho, Hong Joo ; Lee, Dong Sook ; Kim, Ohkmae ; Hwang, Inhwan ; Suh, Mi Chung. / Disruption of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored lipid transfer protein gene altered cuticular lipid composition, increased plastoglobules, and enhanced susceptibility to infection by the fungal pathogen alternaria brassicicola. In: Plant Physiology. 2009 ; Vol. 150, No. 1. pp. 42-54.
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