Do forests receive occult inputs of nitrogen?

Dan Binkley, Yo Whan Son, David W. Valentine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The nitrogen (N) cycle of forest ecosystems is understood relatively well, and few scientists expect that major revisions will be necessary; most current work on N cycling focuses on improving the precision estimates of pools and fluxes, or measuring the magnitudes of well-known pools in response to management or disturbances. However, in the past few decades more than a dozen articles in refereed journals have claimed very high rates of N input, far beyond the rates expected for known sources of N. In this review, we summarize the literature on N accretion rates in forests that lack substantial contributions from symbiotic N-fixing plants. We critique each study for the strength of the experimental design behind the estimate of N accretion and consider whether unexpectedly large inputs of N really occur in forests. Only 6 of 24 estimates of N accretion had strong experimental designs, and only 2 of these 6 yielded estimates of >5 kg N ha-1 y-1. The high accretion estimates with a strong experimental design come from repeated sampling at the Walker Branch Watersheds in Tennessee, where N accretion rates ranged from 50 to 80 kg-N ha-1 y-1 over 15 years after harvesting. At the same location, an unharvested stand showed no significant change. We conclude that there is no widespread evidence of high rates of occult N input in forests. Too few studies have carefully tested for balanced N budgets in forests (inputs minus outputs plus change in storage), and we recommend that at least a few of these studies be undertaken on soils that permit high precision sampling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-331
Number of pages11
JournalEcosystems
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Jul 1

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Design of experiments
Nitrogen
accretion
experimental design
nitrogen
Sampling
Watersheds
Ecosystems
forest ecosystems
Fluxes
Soils
sampling
forest ecosystem
rate
watershed
disturbance
soil

Keywords

  • Forest biogeochemistry
  • Long-term studies
  • Nitrogen input

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology

Cite this

Do forests receive occult inputs of nitrogen? / Binkley, Dan; Son, Yo Whan; Valentine, David W.

In: Ecosystems, Vol. 3, No. 4, 01.07.2000, p. 321-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Binkley, Dan ; Son, Yo Whan ; Valentine, David W. / Do forests receive occult inputs of nitrogen?. In: Ecosystems. 2000 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 321-331.
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