Docosahexaenoic acid-mediated protein aggregates may reduce proteasome activity and delay myotube degradation during muscle atrophy in vitro

Seung Kyun Shin, Ji Hyeon Kim, Jung Hoon Lee, Young Hoon Son, Min Wook Lee, Hak Joong Kim, Sue Ah Noh, Kwang Pyo Kim, In Gyu Kim, Min Jae Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Proteasomes are the primary degradation machinery for oxidatively damaged proteins that compose a class of misfolded protein substrates. Cellular levels of reactive oxygen species increase with age and this cellular propensity is particularly harmful when combined with the age-associated development of various human disorders including cancer, neurodegenerative disease and muscle atrophy. Proteasome activity is reportedly downregulated in these disease conditions. Herein, we report that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a major dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, mediates intermolecular protein cross-linkages through oxidation, and the resulting protein aggregates potently reduce proteasomal activity both in vitro and in cultured cells. Cellular models overexpressing aggregation-prone proteins such as tau showed significantly elevated levels of tau aggregates and total ubiquitin conjugates in the presence of DHA, thereby reflecting suppressed proteasome activity. Strong synergetic cytotoxicity was observed when the cells overexpressing tau were simultaneously treated with DHA. Antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine significantly desensitized the cells to DHA-induced oxidative stress. DHA significantly delayed the proteasomal degradation of muscle proteins in a cellular atrophy model. Thus, the results of our study identified DHA as a potent inducer of cellular protein aggregates that inhibit proteasome activity and potentially delay systemic muscle protein degradation in certain pathologic conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere287
JournalExperimental and Molecular Medicine
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 13

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Docosahexaenoic acid-mediated protein aggregates may reduce proteasome activity and delay myotube degradation during muscle atrophy in vitro'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this