Does minocycline have antidepressant effect?

Chi Un Pae, David M. Marks, Changsu Han, Ashwin A. Patkar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Only one-third of patients undergoing monotherapy with an antidepressant achieve remission of their depressive symptoms and gain functional recovery. Therefore, further exploration of antidepressant mechanisms of action is important in order to facilitate the development of antidepressants with new modes of action. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that major depression is associated with impaired inflammatory responses and deficient neuroprotection. In this regard, we propose that the second-generation tetracycline "minocycline" may hold a potential as a new treatment for major depression. Emerging findings in animal and human studies of minocycline reveal that it has antidepressant-like neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory actions, and minocycline has been shown to perform as an antidepressant in an accepted animal model (forced swimming test). Anecdotal evidence supports minocycline's efficacy for augmentation of antidepressants in major depressive disorder. The following review describes the evidence supporting the consideration of minocycline as a potential antidepressant. We suggest that minocycline may be particularly helpful in patients with depression and comorbid cognitive impairment, as well as depression associated with organic brain disease. We also describe the antinociceptive effect of minocycline and propose a role for minocycline in the treatment of patients with major depression and prominent somatic discomfort and somatoform spectrum disorders. The lack of clinical studies of minocycline for depression is noted. Further studies of the potential therapeutic mechanism of minocycline and its therapeutic implications for major depression are warranted, and may substantially contribute to the development of newer and more effective antidepressants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)308-311
Number of pages4
JournalBiomedicine and Pharmacotherapy
Volume62
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jun 1

Fingerprint

Minocycline
Antidepressive Agents
Depression
Somatoform Disorders
Major Depressive Disorder
Brain Diseases
Therapeutics
Tetracycline
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Animal Models

Keywords

  • Anti-inflammatory effect
  • Depression
  • Minocycline
  • Neuroprotection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Does minocycline have antidepressant effect? / Pae, Chi Un; Marks, David M.; Han, Changsu; Patkar, Ashwin A.

In: Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 62, No. 5, 01.06.2008, p. 308-311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pae, Chi Un ; Marks, David M. ; Han, Changsu ; Patkar, Ashwin A. / Does minocycline have antidepressant effect?. In: Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy. 2008 ; Vol. 62, No. 5. pp. 308-311.
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