Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells

John P. Chamberland, Hyun-Seuk Moon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1–5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA’s mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-30
Number of pages6
JournalFamilial Cancer
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Oct 22

Fingerprint

alpha-Linolenic Acid
Colonic Neoplasms
Down-Regulation
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Cell Line
Carbon
Cell Proliferation
Juglans
Flax
Essential Fatty Acids
Plant Oils
Chemoprevention
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Cell Adhesion
Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Seeds
Therapeutics
Breast Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Alpha linolenic acid
  • Cell adhesion
  • Colon cancer
  • Colony formation
  • Invasion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics
  • Oncology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells. / Chamberland, John P.; Moon, Hyun-Seuk.

In: Familial Cancer, Vol. 14, No. 1, 22.10.2014, p. 25-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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