Early-life body mass index and risks of breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers: a dose–response meta-analysis of prospective studies

Dohyun Byun, Sung Eun Hong, Seaun Ryu, Yeonju Nam, Hajin Jang, Yoonkyoung Cho, Na Na Keum, Hannah Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The evidence for the associations between early-life adiposity and female cancer risks is mixed. Little is known about the exact shape of the relationships and whether the associations are independent of adult adiposity. Methods: We conducted dose–response meta-analyses of prospective studies to summarise the relationships of early-life body mass index (BMI) with breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risks. Pubmed and Embase were searched through June 2020 to identify relevant studies. Using random-effects models, the summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated per 5-kg/m2 increase in BMI at ages ≤ 25 years. A nonlinear dose–response meta-analysis was conducted using restricted cubic spline analysis. Results: After screening 33,948 publications, 37 prospective studies were included in this analysis. The summary RRs associated with every 5-kg/m2 increase in early-life BMI were 0.84 (95% CI = 0.81–0.87) for breast, 1.40 (95% CI = 1.25–1.57) for endometrial, and 1.15 (95% CI = 1.07–1.23) for ovarian cancers. For breast cancer, the association remained statistically significant after adjustment for adult BMI (RR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.73–0.87). For premenopausal breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers, the dose–response curves suggested evidence of nonlinearity. Conclusions: With early-life adiposity, our data support an inverse association with breast cancer and positive associations with ovarian and endometrial cancer risks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)664-672
Number of pages9
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume126
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Mar 9

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Early-life body mass index and risks of breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers: a dose–response meta-analysis of prospective studies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this