Early results of cryosurgery in varicose veins in Korea: Safety and feasibility

Eun Jue Yi, Sung Ho Lee, Jong Ho Cho, Kwang Taik Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cryosurgery was recently introduced as a treatment for varicose veins in the lower extremities. Cryosurgery with freezing probes can be used to remove the great saphenous vein (GSV) via an inguinal incision alone. The aim of this study was to assess early outcomes and the feasibility of cryosurgery for varicose veins. Materials and Methods: Forty patients were enrolled in the present study from March 2009 to July 2010. All patients underwent careful physical examinations, and their GSV reflux was demonstrated by duplex ultrasonography. Clinical severity was measured according to the clinical-etiology-anatomy-pathophysiology (CEAP) classification. The impaired GSVs were removed with rigid cryoprobes after freezing. Patients had follow-up appointments at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Sclerotherapy was performed during follow-up on an outpatient basis as needed. Results: A total of 19 men and 21 women were enrolled. The mean follow-up duration was 3.4 months (range, 1 to 12 months). The clinical severity ranged from CEAP 2 to CEAP 6a. Thirty-eight patients underwent concomitant phlebectomy during surgery. No recurrences were reported during follow-up. There were three cases of minor complications. Two patients had paresthesia, and one had thrombophlebitis. Conclusion: Using cryosurgery techniques to treat varicose veins, the complication rates were minimal and outcomes were comparable to those of previous reports. This procedure is a safe and feasible treatment modality for varicose veins.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-160
Number of pages6
JournalKorean Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jun 1

Fingerprint

Cryosurgery
Varicose Veins
Korea
Safety
Anatomy
Saphenous Vein
Freezing
Thrombophlebitis
Sclerotherapy
Groin
Paresthesia
Physical Examination
Lower Extremity
Ultrasonography
Appointments and Schedules
Outpatients
Recurrence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cryosurgery
  • Safety
  • Saphenous vein
  • Varicose veins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Early results of cryosurgery in varicose veins in Korea : Safety and feasibility. / Yi, Eun Jue; Lee, Sung Ho; Cho, Jong Ho; Kim, Kwang Taik.

In: Korean Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 45, No. 3, 01.06.2012, p. 155-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{baddf817b59f487ab4ffefadfe4d22d0,
title = "Early results of cryosurgery in varicose veins in Korea: Safety and feasibility",
abstract = "Background: Cryosurgery was recently introduced as a treatment for varicose veins in the lower extremities. Cryosurgery with freezing probes can be used to remove the great saphenous vein (GSV) via an inguinal incision alone. The aim of this study was to assess early outcomes and the feasibility of cryosurgery for varicose veins. Materials and Methods: Forty patients were enrolled in the present study from March 2009 to July 2010. All patients underwent careful physical examinations, and their GSV reflux was demonstrated by duplex ultrasonography. Clinical severity was measured according to the clinical-etiology-anatomy-pathophysiology (CEAP) classification. The impaired GSVs were removed with rigid cryoprobes after freezing. Patients had follow-up appointments at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Sclerotherapy was performed during follow-up on an outpatient basis as needed. Results: A total of 19 men and 21 women were enrolled. The mean follow-up duration was 3.4 months (range, 1 to 12 months). The clinical severity ranged from CEAP 2 to CEAP 6a. Thirty-eight patients underwent concomitant phlebectomy during surgery. No recurrences were reported during follow-up. There were three cases of minor complications. Two patients had paresthesia, and one had thrombophlebitis. Conclusion: Using cryosurgery techniques to treat varicose veins, the complication rates were minimal and outcomes were comparable to those of previous reports. This procedure is a safe and feasible treatment modality for varicose veins.",
keywords = "Cryosurgery, Safety, Saphenous vein, Varicose veins",
author = "Yi, {Eun Jue} and Lee, {Sung Ho} and Cho, {Jong Ho} and Kim, {Kwang Taik}",
year = "2012",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.5090/kjtcs.2012.45.3.155",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "155--160",
journal = "Cancer Research and Treatment",
issn = "1598-2998",
publisher = "Korean Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early results of cryosurgery in varicose veins in Korea

T2 - Safety and feasibility

AU - Yi, Eun Jue

AU - Lee, Sung Ho

AU - Cho, Jong Ho

AU - Kim, Kwang Taik

PY - 2012/6/1

Y1 - 2012/6/1

N2 - Background: Cryosurgery was recently introduced as a treatment for varicose veins in the lower extremities. Cryosurgery with freezing probes can be used to remove the great saphenous vein (GSV) via an inguinal incision alone. The aim of this study was to assess early outcomes and the feasibility of cryosurgery for varicose veins. Materials and Methods: Forty patients were enrolled in the present study from March 2009 to July 2010. All patients underwent careful physical examinations, and their GSV reflux was demonstrated by duplex ultrasonography. Clinical severity was measured according to the clinical-etiology-anatomy-pathophysiology (CEAP) classification. The impaired GSVs were removed with rigid cryoprobes after freezing. Patients had follow-up appointments at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Sclerotherapy was performed during follow-up on an outpatient basis as needed. Results: A total of 19 men and 21 women were enrolled. The mean follow-up duration was 3.4 months (range, 1 to 12 months). The clinical severity ranged from CEAP 2 to CEAP 6a. Thirty-eight patients underwent concomitant phlebectomy during surgery. No recurrences were reported during follow-up. There were three cases of minor complications. Two patients had paresthesia, and one had thrombophlebitis. Conclusion: Using cryosurgery techniques to treat varicose veins, the complication rates were minimal and outcomes were comparable to those of previous reports. This procedure is a safe and feasible treatment modality for varicose veins.

AB - Background: Cryosurgery was recently introduced as a treatment for varicose veins in the lower extremities. Cryosurgery with freezing probes can be used to remove the great saphenous vein (GSV) via an inguinal incision alone. The aim of this study was to assess early outcomes and the feasibility of cryosurgery for varicose veins. Materials and Methods: Forty patients were enrolled in the present study from March 2009 to July 2010. All patients underwent careful physical examinations, and their GSV reflux was demonstrated by duplex ultrasonography. Clinical severity was measured according to the clinical-etiology-anatomy-pathophysiology (CEAP) classification. The impaired GSVs were removed with rigid cryoprobes after freezing. Patients had follow-up appointments at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Sclerotherapy was performed during follow-up on an outpatient basis as needed. Results: A total of 19 men and 21 women were enrolled. The mean follow-up duration was 3.4 months (range, 1 to 12 months). The clinical severity ranged from CEAP 2 to CEAP 6a. Thirty-eight patients underwent concomitant phlebectomy during surgery. No recurrences were reported during follow-up. There were three cases of minor complications. Two patients had paresthesia, and one had thrombophlebitis. Conclusion: Using cryosurgery techniques to treat varicose veins, the complication rates were minimal and outcomes were comparable to those of previous reports. This procedure is a safe and feasible treatment modality for varicose veins.

KW - Cryosurgery

KW - Safety

KW - Saphenous vein

KW - Varicose veins

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84865572628&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84865572628&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5090/kjtcs.2012.45.3.155

DO - 10.5090/kjtcs.2012.45.3.155

M3 - Article

C2 - 22708082

AN - SCOPUS:84865572628

VL - 45

SP - 155

EP - 160

JO - Cancer Research and Treatment

JF - Cancer Research and Treatment

SN - 1598-2998

IS - 3

ER -