Early-vs late-onset subcortical vascular cognitive impairment

Young Kyoung Jang, Hunki Kwon, Yeo Jin Kim, Na Yeon Jung, Jin San Lee, Juyoun Lee, Juhee Chin, Kiho Im, Seun Jeon, Jong Min Lee, Jun Kyung Seong, Jeong Hun Kim, Seonwoo Kim, Yearn Seong Choe, Kyung Han Lee, Sung Tae Kim, Jae Seung Kim, Jae Hong Lee, Duk L. Na, Sang Won SeoHee Jin Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the differences between early-onset subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (EO-SVCI) and late-onset subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (LO-SVCI) with regard to pathologic burden, structural changes, and cognitive function. Methods: We prospectively recruited 142 patients from a single referral center. Patients were divided into EO-SVCI (n 30, age at onset <65 years) and LO-SVCI (n 112, age at onset ≥65 years) groups. All patients underwent neuropsychological tests, 3T brain MRI, and [ 11 C] Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET. We compared pathologic burden such as small vessel disease and amyloid burden; structural changes such as structural network, cortical thickness, and hippocampal volume; and cognitive function between EO-SVCI and LO-SVCI. Results: EO-SVCI patients had more lacunes, while LO-SVCI patients had higher PiB standardized uptake value ratios. EO-SVCI patients exhibited more severe structural network disruptions in the frontal area, while LO-SVCI patients exhibited more severe cortical and hippocampal atrophy. Although disease severity did not differ between the 2 groups, frontal-executive dysfunction was more severe in EO-SVCI patients. Conclusions: EO-SVCI patients showed more vascular related factors, while LO-SVCI patients exhibited more Alzheimer disease-related characteristics. The greater number of lacunes in EO-SVCI might account for the more severe frontal network disruption and frontal-executive dysfunction, while the greater amyloid burden in LO-SVCI might account for the more severe cortical and hippocampal atrophy. Our findings suggest that the age at onset is a crucial factor that determines distinct features in SVCI patients, such as pathologic burden, structural changes, and cognitive function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)527-534
Number of pages8
JournalNeurology
Volume86
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Feb 9
Externally publishedYes

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Blood Vessels
Age of Onset
Cognition
Cognitive Dysfunction
Amyloid
Atrophy
Neuropsychological Tests
Alzheimer Disease
Referral and Consultation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Jang, Y. K., Kwon, H., Kim, Y. J., Jung, N. Y., Lee, J. S., Lee, J., ... Kim, H. J. (2016). Early-vs late-onset subcortical vascular cognitive impairment. Neurology, 86(6), 527-534. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000002357

Early-vs late-onset subcortical vascular cognitive impairment. / Jang, Young Kyoung; Kwon, Hunki; Kim, Yeo Jin; Jung, Na Yeon; Lee, Jin San; Lee, Juyoun; Chin, Juhee; Im, Kiho; Jeon, Seun; Lee, Jong Min; Seong, Jun Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Seonwoo; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Jae Seung; Lee, Jae Hong; Na, Duk L.; Seo, Sang Won; Kim, Hee Jin.

In: Neurology, Vol. 86, No. 6, 09.02.2016, p. 527-534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jang, YK, Kwon, H, Kim, YJ, Jung, NY, Lee, JS, Lee, J, Chin, J, Im, K, Jeon, S, Lee, JM, Seong, JK, Kim, JH, Kim, S, Choe, YS, Lee, KH, Kim, ST, Kim, JS, Lee, JH, Na, DL, Seo, SW & Kim, HJ 2016, 'Early-vs late-onset subcortical vascular cognitive impairment', Neurology, vol. 86, no. 6, pp. 527-534. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000002357
Jang YK, Kwon H, Kim YJ, Jung NY, Lee JS, Lee J et al. Early-vs late-onset subcortical vascular cognitive impairment. Neurology. 2016 Feb 9;86(6):527-534. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000002357
Jang, Young Kyoung ; Kwon, Hunki ; Kim, Yeo Jin ; Jung, Na Yeon ; Lee, Jin San ; Lee, Juyoun ; Chin, Juhee ; Im, Kiho ; Jeon, Seun ; Lee, Jong Min ; Seong, Jun Kyung ; Kim, Jeong Hun ; Kim, Seonwoo ; Choe, Yearn Seong ; Lee, Kyung Han ; Kim, Sung Tae ; Kim, Jae Seung ; Lee, Jae Hong ; Na, Duk L. ; Seo, Sang Won ; Kim, Hee Jin. / Early-vs late-onset subcortical vascular cognitive impairment. In: Neurology. 2016 ; Vol. 86, No. 6. pp. 527-534.
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AU - Kwon, Hunki

AU - Kim, Yeo Jin

AU - Jung, Na Yeon

AU - Lee, Jin San

AU - Lee, Juyoun

AU - Chin, Juhee

AU - Im, Kiho

AU - Jeon, Seun

AU - Lee, Jong Min

AU - Seong, Jun Kyung

AU - Kim, Jeong Hun

AU - Kim, Seonwoo

AU - Choe, Yearn Seong

AU - Lee, Kyung Han

AU - Kim, Sung Tae

AU - Kim, Jae Seung

AU - Lee, Jae Hong

AU - Na, Duk L.

AU - Seo, Sang Won

AU - Kim, Hee Jin

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N2 - Objective: To evaluate the differences between early-onset subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (EO-SVCI) and late-onset subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (LO-SVCI) with regard to pathologic burden, structural changes, and cognitive function. Methods: We prospectively recruited 142 patients from a single referral center. Patients were divided into EO-SVCI (n 30, age at onset <65 years) and LO-SVCI (n 112, age at onset ≥65 years) groups. All patients underwent neuropsychological tests, 3T brain MRI, and [ 11 C] Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET. We compared pathologic burden such as small vessel disease and amyloid burden; structural changes such as structural network, cortical thickness, and hippocampal volume; and cognitive function between EO-SVCI and LO-SVCI. Results: EO-SVCI patients had more lacunes, while LO-SVCI patients had higher PiB standardized uptake value ratios. EO-SVCI patients exhibited more severe structural network disruptions in the frontal area, while LO-SVCI patients exhibited more severe cortical and hippocampal atrophy. Although disease severity did not differ between the 2 groups, frontal-executive dysfunction was more severe in EO-SVCI patients. Conclusions: EO-SVCI patients showed more vascular related factors, while LO-SVCI patients exhibited more Alzheimer disease-related characteristics. The greater number of lacunes in EO-SVCI might account for the more severe frontal network disruption and frontal-executive dysfunction, while the greater amyloid burden in LO-SVCI might account for the more severe cortical and hippocampal atrophy. Our findings suggest that the age at onset is a crucial factor that determines distinct features in SVCI patients, such as pathologic burden, structural changes, and cognitive function.

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