EEG-based BCI for the linear control of an upper-limb neuroprosthesis

Carmen Vidaurre, Christian Klauer, Thomas Schauer, Ander Ramos-Murguialday, Klaus Muller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Assistive technologies help patients to reacquire interacting capabilities with the environment and improve their quality of life. In this manuscript we present a feasibility study in which healthy users were able to use a non-invasive Motor Imagery (MI)-based brain computer interface (BCI) to achieve linear control of an upper-limb functional electrical stimulation (FES) controlled neuro-prosthesis. The linear control allowed the real-time computation of a continuous control signal that was used by the FES system to physically set the stimulation parameters to control the upper-limb position. Even if the nature of the task makes the operation very challenging, the participants achieved a mean selection accuracy of 82.5% in a target selection experiment. An analysis of limb kinematics as well as the positioning precision was performed, showing the viability of using a BCI–FES system to control upper-limb reaching movements. The results of this study constitute an accurate use of an online non-invasive BCI to operate a FES-neuroprosthesis setting a step toward the recovery of the control of an impaired limb with the sole use of brain activity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1195-1204
Number of pages10
JournalMedical Engineering and Physics
Volume38
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Nov 1

Fingerprint

Brain-Computer Interfaces
Brain computer interface
Electroencephalography
Upper Extremity
Electric Stimulation
Extremities
Self-Help Devices
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Feasibility Studies
Biomechanical Phenomena
Prostheses and Implants
Quality of Life
Brain
Kinematics
Recovery

Keywords

  • Brain–computer interfacing
  • Functional electrical stimulation
  • Motor imagery
  • Neuralprosthesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Vidaurre, C., Klauer, C., Schauer, T., Ramos-Murguialday, A., & Muller, K. (2016). EEG-based BCI for the linear control of an upper-limb neuroprosthesis. Medical Engineering and Physics, 38(11), 1195-1204. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.medengphy.2016.06.010

EEG-based BCI for the linear control of an upper-limb neuroprosthesis. / Vidaurre, Carmen; Klauer, Christian; Schauer, Thomas; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Muller, Klaus.

In: Medical Engineering and Physics, Vol. 38, No. 11, 01.11.2016, p. 1195-1204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vidaurre, C, Klauer, C, Schauer, T, Ramos-Murguialday, A & Muller, K 2016, 'EEG-based BCI for the linear control of an upper-limb neuroprosthesis', Medical Engineering and Physics, vol. 38, no. 11, pp. 1195-1204. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.medengphy.2016.06.010
Vidaurre, Carmen ; Klauer, Christian ; Schauer, Thomas ; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander ; Muller, Klaus. / EEG-based BCI for the linear control of an upper-limb neuroprosthesis. In: Medical Engineering and Physics. 2016 ; Vol. 38, No. 11. pp. 1195-1204.
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