Effect of adiponectin and sex steroid hormones on bone mineral density and bone formation markers in postmenopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism

Ki Hoon Ahn, Seung Hyeun Lee, Hyun-Tae Park, Tak Kim, Jun Young Hur, Young Tae Kim, Sun Haeng Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The relationship between adiponectin and sex hormones with bone mineral density (BMD) and bone formation markers was investigated in postmenopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCH). Methods: Seventy-five postmenopausal women were selected among the patients who participated in a health screening program in 2007. Thirty-seven control women with normal thyroid function were matched to 38 women with SCH by age, body mass index (BMI), and years since menopause (YSM). The associations between adiponectin and sex hormones with lumbar spine BMD and bone turnover markers were investigated. Results: Adiponectin, testosterone (T; total and free forms), and thyroid-stimulating hormone were significantly different between the women with SCH and euthyroid. After adjusting for age, BMI, and YSM, free T (r = 0.351; P = 0.029) and estradiol (E2; r = -0.368; P = 0.024) had significant associations with bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP). Total T (r = 0.388; P = 0.021) and E2 (r = -0.376; P = 0.026) had significant associations with osteocalcin. However, there were no significant associations between adiponectin and sex hormones with the BMD levels in the SCH subjects. Conclusion: There were correlations between sex hormones with B-ALP and osteocalcin, but no associations between adiponectin and sex hormones with the lumbar spine BMD in postmenopausal SCH patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)370-376
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Apr 1

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Adiponectin
Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Hyperthyroidism
Osteogenesis
Bone Density
Bone and Bones
Osteocalcin
Menopause
Alkaline Phosphatase
Spine
Body Mass Index
Bone Remodeling
Thyrotropin
Testosterone
Estradiol
Thyroid Gland
Health

Keywords

  • Adiponectin
  • Bone
  • Postmenopause
  • Sex hormones
  • Subclinical hyperthyroidism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

Effect of adiponectin and sex steroid hormones on bone mineral density and bone formation markers in postmenopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism. / Ahn, Ki Hoon; Lee, Seung Hyeun; Park, Hyun-Tae; Kim, Tak; Hur, Jun Young; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Sun Haeng.

In: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research, Vol. 36, No. 2, 01.04.2010, p. 370-376.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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