Effect of baseplate size on primary glenoid stability and impingement-free range of motion in reverse shoulder arthroplasty

Soo Won Chae, Soung Yon Kim, Haea Lee, Joung Ro Yon, Juneyoung Lee, Seung Ho Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Use of a baseplate with a smaller diameter in reverse shoulder arthroplasty is increasing, especially in patients with a small glenoid or glenoid wear. However, the effect of a smaller baseplate on stability of the glenoid component has not been evaluated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a smaller baseplate (25 mm) is beneficial to the initial stability of the glenoid component compared to that with a baseplate of a commonly used size (29 mm). Methods: Micromotion of glenoid components attached to 14 scapulae of fresh-frozen cadavers was measured and compared between 25- And 29-mm baseplates in biomechanical testing. Impingement-free range of motion in abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation was evaluated by using a simulated computer model constructed based on the same fresh-frozen cadavers used in biomechanical testing. Results: Micromotion at the inferior third of the glenoid-glenosphere interface was higher in the 29-mm baseplate group than in the 25-mm baseplate group during both 0.7- And 1-body weight cyclic loading in biomechanical testing. Adduction deficit was smaller, and total impingement-free range of motion from abduction to adduction and rotation were greater in the 25-mm baseplate group than in the 29-mm baseplate group in the simulated computer model. Conclusions: Use of a baseplate with a smaller diameter (25 mm) in reverse shoulder arthroplasty is suitable for improving the primary stability of the glenoid component. With a smaller baseplate, impingement-free range of motion is optimized in a smaller glenoid.

Original languageEnglish
Article number417
JournalBMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Articular Range of Motion
Arthroplasty
Cadaver
Computer Simulation
Scapula
Body Weight

Keywords

  • Biomechanical testing
  • Reverse shoulder arthroplasty
  • Simulated computer model
  • Smaller baseplate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Effect of baseplate size on primary glenoid stability and impingement-free range of motion in reverse shoulder arthroplasty. / Chae, Soo Won; Kim, Soung Yon; Lee, Haea; Yon, Joung Ro; Lee, Juneyoung; Han, Seung Ho.

In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, Vol. 15, No. 1, 417, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lee, Juneyoung

AU - Han, Seung Ho

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N2 - Background: Use of a baseplate with a smaller diameter in reverse shoulder arthroplasty is increasing, especially in patients with a small glenoid or glenoid wear. However, the effect of a smaller baseplate on stability of the glenoid component has not been evaluated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a smaller baseplate (25 mm) is beneficial to the initial stability of the glenoid component compared to that with a baseplate of a commonly used size (29 mm). Methods: Micromotion of glenoid components attached to 14 scapulae of fresh-frozen cadavers was measured and compared between 25- And 29-mm baseplates in biomechanical testing. Impingement-free range of motion in abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation was evaluated by using a simulated computer model constructed based on the same fresh-frozen cadavers used in biomechanical testing. Results: Micromotion at the inferior third of the glenoid-glenosphere interface was higher in the 29-mm baseplate group than in the 25-mm baseplate group during both 0.7- And 1-body weight cyclic loading in biomechanical testing. Adduction deficit was smaller, and total impingement-free range of motion from abduction to adduction and rotation were greater in the 25-mm baseplate group than in the 29-mm baseplate group in the simulated computer model. Conclusions: Use of a baseplate with a smaller diameter (25 mm) in reverse shoulder arthroplasty is suitable for improving the primary stability of the glenoid component. With a smaller baseplate, impingement-free range of motion is optimized in a smaller glenoid.

AB - Background: Use of a baseplate with a smaller diameter in reverse shoulder arthroplasty is increasing, especially in patients with a small glenoid or glenoid wear. However, the effect of a smaller baseplate on stability of the glenoid component has not been evaluated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a smaller baseplate (25 mm) is beneficial to the initial stability of the glenoid component compared to that with a baseplate of a commonly used size (29 mm). Methods: Micromotion of glenoid components attached to 14 scapulae of fresh-frozen cadavers was measured and compared between 25- And 29-mm baseplates in biomechanical testing. Impingement-free range of motion in abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation was evaluated by using a simulated computer model constructed based on the same fresh-frozen cadavers used in biomechanical testing. Results: Micromotion at the inferior third of the glenoid-glenosphere interface was higher in the 29-mm baseplate group than in the 25-mm baseplate group during both 0.7- And 1-body weight cyclic loading in biomechanical testing. Adduction deficit was smaller, and total impingement-free range of motion from abduction to adduction and rotation were greater in the 25-mm baseplate group than in the 29-mm baseplate group in the simulated computer model. Conclusions: Use of a baseplate with a smaller diameter (25 mm) in reverse shoulder arthroplasty is suitable for improving the primary stability of the glenoid component. With a smaller baseplate, impingement-free range of motion is optimized in a smaller glenoid.

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