Effect of cross-linking on the dimensional stability and biocompatibility of a tailored 3D-bioprinted gelatin scaffold

Dong Jin Choi, Young Jae Kho, Sang Jun Park, Young Jin Kim, Seok Chung, Chun Ho Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Biocompatible and biodegradable gelatin is a good candidate bioink for use in 3D bioprinting technologies, but viscous gelatin solution has a low printability. In order to improve the poor printability of gelatin, we optimized the rheological properties of gelatin solution. 3D gelatin scaffolds were then cross-linked using physical or chemical methods to maintain the 3D structure. The physicochemical and biological differences between the two types of cross-linked gelatin scaffolds were studied. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that the morphologies of the resulting cross-linked 3D scaffolds maintained their structural stabilities. The physically cross-linked 3D scaffolds maintained their surface sizes without a significant decrease (less than a 3% reduction in the surface size was observed)after cross-linking. To evaluate the differences in cell affinity by two types of cross-linking method, human dermal fibroblasts cultured on the cross-linked 3D scaffolds. After 14 days of culturing, DNA assays showed that the cell proliferation rate of the physically cross-linked 3D scaffold was 44% higher than that of the chemically cross-linked 3D scaffold. In conclusion, the optimized physically cross-linked 3D scaffold retained its surface size without significant decreases after cross-linking, as required by 3D-printed patient-specific tissue engineered customized scaffolds, despite the use of water-soluble gelatin hydrogels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)659-667
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Biological Macromolecules
Volume135
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Aug 15

Fingerprint

Dimensional stability
Gelatin
Scaffolds (biology)
Biocompatibility
Scaffolds
Bioprinting
Hydrogels
Crosslinking
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Cell proliferation
Fibroblasts
Cell Proliferation
Technology
Assays
DNA
Skin
Water
Tissue
Scanning electron microscopy

Keywords

  • 3D bioprinting
  • Cross-linking
  • Dried heat treatment
  • Gelatin hydrogel
  • Tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Structural Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Energy(all)

Cite this

Effect of cross-linking on the dimensional stability and biocompatibility of a tailored 3D-bioprinted gelatin scaffold. / Choi, Dong Jin; Kho, Young Jae; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Young Jin; Chung, Seok; Kim, Chun Ho.

In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, Vol. 135, 15.08.2019, p. 659-667.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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