Effect of food characteristics, storage conditions, and electron beam irradiation on active agent release from polyamide-coated LDPE films

Jaejoon Han, M. E. Castell-Perez, R. G. Moreira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation, storage conditions, and model food pH on the release characteristics of trans-cinnamaldehyde incorporated into polyamide-coated low-density polyethylene (LDPE) films. Active agent release rate on irradiated films (up to 20.0 kGy) decreased by 69% compared with the nonirradiated controls, from 0.252 to 0.086 μg/mL/h. Storage temperature (4, 21, and 35°C) and pH (4, 7, and 10) of the food simulant solutions (10% aqueous ethanol) affected the release rate of trans-cinnamaldehyde. As expected, antimicrobial release rate decreased to 0.013 μg/mL/h at the refrigerated temperature (4°C) compared to the higher temperatures (0.029 and 0.035 μg/mL/h at 21 and 35°C). The fastest release rate occurred when exposed to the acidic food simulant solution (pH 4). In aqueous solution, trans-cinnamaldehyde was highly unstable to ionizing radiation, with loss in concentration from 24.50 to 1.36 μg/mL after exposure to 2.0 kGy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis revealed that exposure to ionizing radiation up to 10.0 kGy did not affect the structural conformation of LDPE/polyamide films and the trans-cinnamaldehyde in the films, though it induced changes in the functional group of trans-cinnamaldehyde when dose increased up to 20.0 kGy. Studies with a radiation-stable compound (naphthalene) showed that ionizing radiation induced the crosslinking in polymer networks of LDPE/polyamide film and caused slow and gradual release of the compound. This study demonstrated that irradiation serves as a controlling factor for release of active compounds, with potential applications in the development of antimicrobial packaging systems.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Food Science
Volume73
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Mar 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Food Storage
polyethylene film
Nylons
Polyethylene
films (materials)
storage conditions
irradiation
ionizing radiation
electrons
Electrons
Ionizing Radiation
polyethylene
foods
Food
Temperature
exposure assessment
naphthalene
crosslinking
storage temperature
aqueous solutions

Keywords

  • Active packaging
  • Controlled rate
  • Irradiation dose
  • Trans-cinnamaldehyde

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Effect of food characteristics, storage conditions, and electron beam irradiation on active agent release from polyamide-coated LDPE films. / Han, Jaejoon; Castell-Perez, M. E.; Moreira, R. G.

In: Journal of Food Science, Vol. 73, No. 2, 01.03.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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