Effect of food service form on eating rate: Meal served in a separated form might lower eating rate

Hyung Joo Suh, Eun Young Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the association between food form (mixed vs separated) and eating rate. The experiment used a within-subjects design (n=29, young healthy women with normal weight). Test meals (white rice and side dishes) with the same content and volume were served at lunch in a mixed or separated form. The form in which the food was served had significant effects on consumption volume and eating rate; subjects ate significantly more (p < 0.05) when a test meal was served as a mixed form (285 g, 575 kcal) compared to a separated form (244 g, 492 kcal). Moreover, subjects also ate significantly faster (p < 0.05) when the test meal was served as a mixed form (22.4 g/min) as compared to a separated form (16.2 g/min). Despite consuming more when the test meal was served as a mixed form than when served as a separated form, the subjects did not feel significantly fuller. In conclusion, we confirmed that meals served in a separated form might lower the eating rate and, moreover, slower eating might be associated with less energy intake, without compromising satiety.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-88
Number of pages4
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Mar 1

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Keywords

  • Eating habit
  • Eating rate
  • Energy intake
  • Food mixing
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine(all)

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