Effect of Structured Bed Exercise on Uterine Contractions, Fetal Heart Rate Patterns, and Maternal Psychophysical Symptoms of Hospitalized High-Risk Pregnant Women: A Randomized Control Trial

Young Jeoum Kim, Young Joo Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined the effect on uterine contraction frequency (UCF), blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns and psychophysical symptoms (physical discomfort, anxiety, and depression) of structured bed exercise (SBE) in hospitalized high-risk pregnant women prescribed bed rest. Methods: Forty-five hospitalized high risk pregnant women at >24 weeks of pregnancy prescribed bed rest were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. From January to May 2014, data were collected using electronic fetal monitoring and patient monitoring of UCF, BP, HR and FHR patterns, and psychophysical symptoms were measured using the antenatal physical discomfort scale, state-trait anxiety scale, and Edinburgh postnatal depression scale. Results: UCF, BP, HR, and FHR patterns (rate, variability, acceleration, and deceleration) did not differ significantly between the experimental and control groups. The experimental group showed a significant increase in baseline FHR after SBE within the normal range, and after SBE, it reduced to the FHR before SBE. The variability, acceleration and deceleration of FHR before and after SBE did not differ significantly between two groups. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference before and after SBE in the experimental group. Also, the experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in physical discomfort score. However, there were no significant differences in depression and anxiety score between two groups. Conclusions: SBE in hospitalized high-risk pregnant women under bed rest did not increase the risk to the fetus, and relieved physical discomfort and anxiety. Therefore, SBE should be considered as a nursing intervention in hospitalized high-risk pregnant women.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAsian Nursing Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2018 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Uterine Contraction
Fetal Heart Rate
Pregnant Women
Mothers
Exercise
Bed Rest
Anxiety
Deceleration
Heart Rate
Blood Pressure
Cardiotocography
Depression
Postpartum Depression
Control Groups
Physiologic Monitoring
Reference Values
Fetus
Nursing
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Exercise
  • Fetal heart
  • High-risk pregnancy
  • Uterine contraction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

@article{79689f2a62fa49cd92600a0b69626e72,
title = "Effect of Structured Bed Exercise on Uterine Contractions, Fetal Heart Rate Patterns, and Maternal Psychophysical Symptoms of Hospitalized High-Risk Pregnant Women: A Randomized Control Trial",
abstract = "Purpose: This study examined the effect on uterine contraction frequency (UCF), blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns and psychophysical symptoms (physical discomfort, anxiety, and depression) of structured bed exercise (SBE) in hospitalized high-risk pregnant women prescribed bed rest. Methods: Forty-five hospitalized high risk pregnant women at >24 weeks of pregnancy prescribed bed rest were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. From January to May 2014, data were collected using electronic fetal monitoring and patient monitoring of UCF, BP, HR and FHR patterns, and psychophysical symptoms were measured using the antenatal physical discomfort scale, state-trait anxiety scale, and Edinburgh postnatal depression scale. Results: UCF, BP, HR, and FHR patterns (rate, variability, acceleration, and deceleration) did not differ significantly between the experimental and control groups. The experimental group showed a significant increase in baseline FHR after SBE within the normal range, and after SBE, it reduced to the FHR before SBE. The variability, acceleration and deceleration of FHR before and after SBE did not differ significantly between two groups. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference before and after SBE in the experimental group. Also, the experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in physical discomfort score. However, there were no significant differences in depression and anxiety score between two groups. Conclusions: SBE in hospitalized high-risk pregnant women under bed rest did not increase the risk to the fetus, and relieved physical discomfort and anxiety. Therefore, SBE should be considered as a nursing intervention in hospitalized high-risk pregnant women.",
keywords = "Anxiety, Exercise, Fetal heart, High-risk pregnancy, Uterine contraction",
author = "Kim, {Young Jeoum} and Park, {Young Joo}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.anr.2017.12.003",
language = "English",
journal = "Asian Nursing Research",
issn = "2005-3673",
publisher = "Taehan Kanho Hakhoe",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of Structured Bed Exercise on Uterine Contractions, Fetal Heart Rate Patterns, and Maternal Psychophysical Symptoms of Hospitalized High-Risk Pregnant Women

T2 - A Randomized Control Trial

AU - Kim, Young Jeoum

AU - Park, Young Joo

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Purpose: This study examined the effect on uterine contraction frequency (UCF), blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns and psychophysical symptoms (physical discomfort, anxiety, and depression) of structured bed exercise (SBE) in hospitalized high-risk pregnant women prescribed bed rest. Methods: Forty-five hospitalized high risk pregnant women at >24 weeks of pregnancy prescribed bed rest were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. From January to May 2014, data were collected using electronic fetal monitoring and patient monitoring of UCF, BP, HR and FHR patterns, and psychophysical symptoms were measured using the antenatal physical discomfort scale, state-trait anxiety scale, and Edinburgh postnatal depression scale. Results: UCF, BP, HR, and FHR patterns (rate, variability, acceleration, and deceleration) did not differ significantly between the experimental and control groups. The experimental group showed a significant increase in baseline FHR after SBE within the normal range, and after SBE, it reduced to the FHR before SBE. The variability, acceleration and deceleration of FHR before and after SBE did not differ significantly between two groups. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference before and after SBE in the experimental group. Also, the experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in physical discomfort score. However, there were no significant differences in depression and anxiety score between two groups. Conclusions: SBE in hospitalized high-risk pregnant women under bed rest did not increase the risk to the fetus, and relieved physical discomfort and anxiety. Therefore, SBE should be considered as a nursing intervention in hospitalized high-risk pregnant women.

AB - Purpose: This study examined the effect on uterine contraction frequency (UCF), blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns and psychophysical symptoms (physical discomfort, anxiety, and depression) of structured bed exercise (SBE) in hospitalized high-risk pregnant women prescribed bed rest. Methods: Forty-five hospitalized high risk pregnant women at >24 weeks of pregnancy prescribed bed rest were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. From January to May 2014, data were collected using electronic fetal monitoring and patient monitoring of UCF, BP, HR and FHR patterns, and psychophysical symptoms were measured using the antenatal physical discomfort scale, state-trait anxiety scale, and Edinburgh postnatal depression scale. Results: UCF, BP, HR, and FHR patterns (rate, variability, acceleration, and deceleration) did not differ significantly between the experimental and control groups. The experimental group showed a significant increase in baseline FHR after SBE within the normal range, and after SBE, it reduced to the FHR before SBE. The variability, acceleration and deceleration of FHR before and after SBE did not differ significantly between two groups. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference before and after SBE in the experimental group. Also, the experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in physical discomfort score. However, there were no significant differences in depression and anxiety score between two groups. Conclusions: SBE in hospitalized high-risk pregnant women under bed rest did not increase the risk to the fetus, and relieved physical discomfort and anxiety. Therefore, SBE should be considered as a nursing intervention in hospitalized high-risk pregnant women.

KW - Anxiety

KW - Exercise

KW - Fetal heart

KW - High-risk pregnancy

KW - Uterine contraction

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041533956&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85041533956&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.anr.2017.12.003

DO - 10.1016/j.anr.2017.12.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 29463485

AN - SCOPUS:85041533956

JO - Asian Nursing Research

JF - Asian Nursing Research

SN - 2005-3673

ER -