Effect of successful surgical treatment on changes of position during sleep in adults with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

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Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes of position during sleep as determined by polysomnography before and after upper airway surgery for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with no response to surgery ("nonresponse group") and in those who did have a response to surgery ("response group"). Methods: We analyzed a total of 106 polysomnograms from 53 subjects and compared the preoperative-postoperative differences in the frequency of positional changes during sleep and the distribution of sleep positions between the nonresponse group (n = 25) and the response group (n = 28). Surgical response was defined as a greater than 50% decrease in the postoperative apnea-hypopnea index. Results: The positional change index in the response group was significantly reduced (from 4.2 ± 3.8 to 2.6 ± 1.6; p = 0.038), whereas the positional change index in the nonresponse group did not significantly change (from 3.4 ± 2.0 to 3.4 ± 2.1; p = 0.861). The proportion of sleep time spent in the supine position did not significantly change in the nonresponse group (from 62.4% ± 18.1% to 60.5% ± 21.3%; p = 0.904) or the response group (from 55.5% ± 23.9% to 60.1% ± 23.1%; p = 0.412). Conclusions: The frequency of positional changes during sleep was significantly decreased with the improvement of respiratory disturbances and arousals in the response group after upper airway surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104-109
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology
Volume120
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Feb 1

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Sleep
Therapeutics
Polysomnography
Supine Position
Apnea
Arousal

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Arousal
  • Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome
  • Polysomnography
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

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title = "Effect of successful surgical treatment on changes of position during sleep in adults with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome",
abstract = "Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes of position during sleep as determined by polysomnography before and after upper airway surgery for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with no response to surgery ({"}nonresponse group{"}) and in those who did have a response to surgery ({"}response group{"}). Methods: We analyzed a total of 106 polysomnograms from 53 subjects and compared the preoperative-postoperative differences in the frequency of positional changes during sleep and the distribution of sleep positions between the nonresponse group (n = 25) and the response group (n = 28). Surgical response was defined as a greater than 50{\%} decrease in the postoperative apnea-hypopnea index. Results: The positional change index in the response group was significantly reduced (from 4.2 ± 3.8 to 2.6 ± 1.6; p = 0.038), whereas the positional change index in the nonresponse group did not significantly change (from 3.4 ± 2.0 to 3.4 ± 2.1; p = 0.861). The proportion of sleep time spent in the supine position did not significantly change in the nonresponse group (from 62.4{\%} ± 18.1{\%} to 60.5{\%} ± 21.3{\%}; p = 0.904) or the response group (from 55.5{\%} ± 23.9{\%} to 60.1{\%} ± 23.1{\%}; p = 0.412). Conclusions: The frequency of positional changes during sleep was significantly decreased with the improvement of respiratory disturbances and arousals in the response group after upper airway surgery.",
keywords = "Adult, Arousal, Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, Polysomnography, Surgery",
author = "Choi, {Ji Ho} and Kim, {Eun Joong} and June Choi and Kwon, {Soon Young} and Lee, {Heung Man} and Tae-Hoon Kim and Lee, {Sang Hag} and Chol Shin and Lee, {Seung Hoon}",
year = "2011",
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T1 - Effect of successful surgical treatment on changes of position during sleep in adults with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

AU - Choi, Ji Ho

AU - Kim, Eun Joong

AU - Choi, June

AU - Kwon, Soon Young

AU - Lee, Heung Man

AU - Kim, Tae-Hoon

AU - Lee, Sang Hag

AU - Shin, Chol

AU - Lee, Seung Hoon

PY - 2011/2/1

Y1 - 2011/2/1

N2 - Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes of position during sleep as determined by polysomnography before and after upper airway surgery for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with no response to surgery ("nonresponse group") and in those who did have a response to surgery ("response group"). Methods: We analyzed a total of 106 polysomnograms from 53 subjects and compared the preoperative-postoperative differences in the frequency of positional changes during sleep and the distribution of sleep positions between the nonresponse group (n = 25) and the response group (n = 28). Surgical response was defined as a greater than 50% decrease in the postoperative apnea-hypopnea index. Results: The positional change index in the response group was significantly reduced (from 4.2 ± 3.8 to 2.6 ± 1.6; p = 0.038), whereas the positional change index in the nonresponse group did not significantly change (from 3.4 ± 2.0 to 3.4 ± 2.1; p = 0.861). The proportion of sleep time spent in the supine position did not significantly change in the nonresponse group (from 62.4% ± 18.1% to 60.5% ± 21.3%; p = 0.904) or the response group (from 55.5% ± 23.9% to 60.1% ± 23.1%; p = 0.412). Conclusions: The frequency of positional changes during sleep was significantly decreased with the improvement of respiratory disturbances and arousals in the response group after upper airway surgery.

AB - Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes of position during sleep as determined by polysomnography before and after upper airway surgery for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with no response to surgery ("nonresponse group") and in those who did have a response to surgery ("response group"). Methods: We analyzed a total of 106 polysomnograms from 53 subjects and compared the preoperative-postoperative differences in the frequency of positional changes during sleep and the distribution of sleep positions between the nonresponse group (n = 25) and the response group (n = 28). Surgical response was defined as a greater than 50% decrease in the postoperative apnea-hypopnea index. Results: The positional change index in the response group was significantly reduced (from 4.2 ± 3.8 to 2.6 ± 1.6; p = 0.038), whereas the positional change index in the nonresponse group did not significantly change (from 3.4 ± 2.0 to 3.4 ± 2.1; p = 0.861). The proportion of sleep time spent in the supine position did not significantly change in the nonresponse group (from 62.4% ± 18.1% to 60.5% ± 21.3%; p = 0.904) or the response group (from 55.5% ± 23.9% to 60.1% ± 23.1%; p = 0.412). Conclusions: The frequency of positional changes during sleep was significantly decreased with the improvement of respiratory disturbances and arousals in the response group after upper airway surgery.

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KW - Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

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