Effects of coffee consumption on serum uric acid: Systematic review and meta-analysis

Kyu Yong Park, Hyun Jung Kim, Hyeong Sik Ahn, Sun Hee Kim, Eun Ji Park, Shin Young Yim, Jae Bum Jun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Study results on the effects of coffee consumption on serum uric acid (UA) have been conflicting. The aim of this study is to analyze the literature regarding the effect of coffee consumption on serum UA. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, and KoreaMed for all articles published before January 2015. Studies with quantitative data on coffee consumption and serum UA level were included. Coffee consumption and serum UA level were identified with/without the risk of gout. Results: Nine studies published between 1999 and 2014 were included, containing a total of 175,310 subjects. Meta-analysis demonstrated that coffee has a significantly lowering effect on serum UA, where there are gender differences in the amount of coffee required to lower serum UA. Women (4-6 cups/day) need more coffee to lower serum UA than men (1-3 cups/day). Meta-analysis showed that coffee intake of 1 cup/day or more was significantly associated with reduction of the risk of gout, with a negative correlation with the amount of daily coffee intake for both genders. Conclusions: This is the first systematic review on the effects of coffee consumption on serum UA. Based on our study, moderate coffee intake might be advocated for primary prevention of hyperuricemia and gout in both genders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)580-586
Number of pages7
JournalSeminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Apr 1

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Coffee
Uric Acid
Meta-Analysis
Serum
Gout
Hyperuricemia
Risk Reduction Behavior
Primary Prevention
MEDLINE
Libraries

Keywords

  • Beverages
  • Caffeine
  • Coffee
  • Gout
  • Hyperuricemia
  • Uric acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Effects of coffee consumption on serum uric acid : Systematic review and meta-analysis. / Park, Kyu Yong; Kim, Hyun Jung; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Kim, Sun Hee; Park, Eun Ji; Yim, Shin Young; Jun, Jae Bum.

In: Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 45, No. 5, 01.04.2016, p. 580-586.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Park, Kyu Yong ; Kim, Hyun Jung ; Ahn, Hyeong Sik ; Kim, Sun Hee ; Park, Eun Ji ; Yim, Shin Young ; Jun, Jae Bum. / Effects of coffee consumption on serum uric acid : Systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism. 2016 ; Vol. 45, No. 5. pp. 580-586.
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