Effects of foot complications in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus on public healthcare: An analysis based on the Korea National Diabetes Program Cohort

KNDP study investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim Diabetes mellitus (DM) patients are susceptible to foot injury or foot diseases such as diabetic foot and peripheral arterial disease. Although these conditions are considered important, few studies have investigated them in detail. Therefore, we investigated the epidemiology of diabetic foot complications (DFC) with respect to the effects on the public healthcare system. Methods We evaluated the incidence, clinical characteristics, health service utilization frequency and medical expenses of DFC in type 2 DM patients in the Korea National Diabetes Program (KNDP), the largest multi-center, prospective cohort in Korea (n = 4405). To determine precise outcomes, we used national representative databases, including claims data from the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service of Korea. Results During a median follow-up period of 3.30 years, 528 patients (12.0%) were newly diagnosed with DFC at an incidence rate of 43.02 cases per 1000 person-years. The patients with DFC were significantly older than patients without DFC, but other clinical characteristics were similar between the two groups. The patients with DFC had more hospital visits (p < 0.001), longer duration of hospitalization (p < 0.001), and increased expenses (p < 0.001) compared to patients without DFC. After multiple adjustments, the differences in number of hospital visits and medical expenses were consistent. In a before and after comparison within the DFC group, all three variables increased significantly after the onset of DFC (p < 0.001). Conclusions DFC were significantly associated with poor clinical outcomes and caused a substantial burden to the national healthcare system in Korea. Therefore, intervention to prevent DFC is important.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)375-380
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Diabetes and its Complications
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Feb 1

Fingerprint

Diabetic Foot
Korea
Diabetes Complications
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Foot
Delivery of Health Care
Foot Diseases
Foot Injuries
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Incidence
Health Insurance
Health Services
Diabetes Mellitus
Epidemiology
Hospitalization

Keywords

  • Diabetes complications
  • Diabetes mellitus, type 2
  • Epidemiology
  • Korea
  • Peripheral vascular diseases
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

@article{11213eb1366e4904b41340d7b75021c1,
title = "Effects of foot complications in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus on public healthcare: An analysis based on the Korea National Diabetes Program Cohort",
abstract = "Aim Diabetes mellitus (DM) patients are susceptible to foot injury or foot diseases such as diabetic foot and peripheral arterial disease. Although these conditions are considered important, few studies have investigated them in detail. Therefore, we investigated the epidemiology of diabetic foot complications (DFC) with respect to the effects on the public healthcare system. Methods We evaluated the incidence, clinical characteristics, health service utilization frequency and medical expenses of DFC in type 2 DM patients in the Korea National Diabetes Program (KNDP), the largest multi-center, prospective cohort in Korea (n = 4405). To determine precise outcomes, we used national representative databases, including claims data from the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service of Korea. Results During a median follow-up period of 3.30 years, 528 patients (12.0{\%}) were newly diagnosed with DFC at an incidence rate of 43.02 cases per 1000 person-years. The patients with DFC were significantly older than patients without DFC, but other clinical characteristics were similar between the two groups. The patients with DFC had more hospital visits (p < 0.001), longer duration of hospitalization (p < 0.001), and increased expenses (p < 0.001) compared to patients without DFC. After multiple adjustments, the differences in number of hospital visits and medical expenses were consistent. In a before and after comparison within the DFC group, all three variables increased significantly after the onset of DFC (p < 0.001). Conclusions DFC were significantly associated with poor clinical outcomes and caused a substantial burden to the national healthcare system in Korea. Therefore, intervention to prevent DFC is important.",
keywords = "Diabetes complications, Diabetes mellitus, type 2, Epidemiology, Korea, Peripheral vascular diseases, Risk factors",
author = "{KNDP study investigators} and Park, {So Young} and Rhee, {Sang Youl} and Suk Chon and Ahn, {Kyu Jeung} and Kim, {Sung Hoon} and Sei-Hyun Baik and Yongsoo Park and Nam, {Moon Suk} and Lee, {Kwan Woo} and Woo, {Jeong taek} and Chun, {Ki Hong} and Kim, {Young Seol}",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2016.06.024",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "375--380",
journal = "Journal of Diabetes and its Complications",
issn = "1056-8727",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of foot complications in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus on public healthcare

T2 - An analysis based on the Korea National Diabetes Program Cohort

AU - KNDP study investigators

AU - Park, So Young

AU - Rhee, Sang Youl

AU - Chon, Suk

AU - Ahn, Kyu Jeung

AU - Kim, Sung Hoon

AU - Baik, Sei-Hyun

AU - Park, Yongsoo

AU - Nam, Moon Suk

AU - Lee, Kwan Woo

AU - Woo, Jeong taek

AU - Chun, Ki Hong

AU - Kim, Young Seol

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - Aim Diabetes mellitus (DM) patients are susceptible to foot injury or foot diseases such as diabetic foot and peripheral arterial disease. Although these conditions are considered important, few studies have investigated them in detail. Therefore, we investigated the epidemiology of diabetic foot complications (DFC) with respect to the effects on the public healthcare system. Methods We evaluated the incidence, clinical characteristics, health service utilization frequency and medical expenses of DFC in type 2 DM patients in the Korea National Diabetes Program (KNDP), the largest multi-center, prospective cohort in Korea (n = 4405). To determine precise outcomes, we used national representative databases, including claims data from the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service of Korea. Results During a median follow-up period of 3.30 years, 528 patients (12.0%) were newly diagnosed with DFC at an incidence rate of 43.02 cases per 1000 person-years. The patients with DFC were significantly older than patients without DFC, but other clinical characteristics were similar between the two groups. The patients with DFC had more hospital visits (p < 0.001), longer duration of hospitalization (p < 0.001), and increased expenses (p < 0.001) compared to patients without DFC. After multiple adjustments, the differences in number of hospital visits and medical expenses were consistent. In a before and after comparison within the DFC group, all three variables increased significantly after the onset of DFC (p < 0.001). Conclusions DFC were significantly associated with poor clinical outcomes and caused a substantial burden to the national healthcare system in Korea. Therefore, intervention to prevent DFC is important.

AB - Aim Diabetes mellitus (DM) patients are susceptible to foot injury or foot diseases such as diabetic foot and peripheral arterial disease. Although these conditions are considered important, few studies have investigated them in detail. Therefore, we investigated the epidemiology of diabetic foot complications (DFC) with respect to the effects on the public healthcare system. Methods We evaluated the incidence, clinical characteristics, health service utilization frequency and medical expenses of DFC in type 2 DM patients in the Korea National Diabetes Program (KNDP), the largest multi-center, prospective cohort in Korea (n = 4405). To determine precise outcomes, we used national representative databases, including claims data from the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service of Korea. Results During a median follow-up period of 3.30 years, 528 patients (12.0%) were newly diagnosed with DFC at an incidence rate of 43.02 cases per 1000 person-years. The patients with DFC were significantly older than patients without DFC, but other clinical characteristics were similar between the two groups. The patients with DFC had more hospital visits (p < 0.001), longer duration of hospitalization (p < 0.001), and increased expenses (p < 0.001) compared to patients without DFC. After multiple adjustments, the differences in number of hospital visits and medical expenses were consistent. In a before and after comparison within the DFC group, all three variables increased significantly after the onset of DFC (p < 0.001). Conclusions DFC were significantly associated with poor clinical outcomes and caused a substantial burden to the national healthcare system in Korea. Therefore, intervention to prevent DFC is important.

KW - Diabetes complications

KW - Diabetes mellitus, type 2

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Korea

KW - Peripheral vascular diseases

KW - Risk factors

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2016.06.024

DO - 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2016.06.024

M3 - Article

C2 - 27445007

AN - SCOPUS:84997079019

VL - 31

SP - 375

EP - 380

JO - Journal of Diabetes and its Complications

JF - Journal of Diabetes and its Complications

SN - 1056-8727

IS - 2

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