Effects of glucose level on early and long-term mortality after intracerebral haemorrhage: The Acute Brain Bleeding Analysis Study

S. H. Lee, B. J. Kim, H. J. Bae, J. S. Lee, Juneyoung Lee, B. J. Park, B. W. Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims/hypothesis: Admission hyperglycaemia is associated with a poor outcome in patients with ischaemic stroke. However, its prognostic effects after intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) are still unclear. Methods: We prospectively enrolled patients with ICH at 33 centres in Korea between October 2002 and March 2004. A total of 1,387 patients who had ICH and underwent brain computed tomography within 48 h of symptom onset were included in the study (n = 1,387). Clinical information and radiological findings were collected at admission. Glucose levels were examined in relation to early (up to 30 days after ictus) and long-term (after 30 days) mortality rates using Cox regression analysis. To eliminate short-term effects, long-term mortality rate analysis was performed on surviving patients for more than 30 days. Results: The long-term mortality rate was 21.1% after a mean follow-up of 434.3 ± 223.2 days and was found to increase significantly with glucose quartile (p < 0.001). Admission glucose level was an independent risk factor for early mortality (per mmol/l; adjusted HR 1.10 [95% CI 1.01-1.19]), but not for long-term mortality. Moreover, when analysis was restricted to patients without diabetes, glucose level was found to be an independent risk factor for post-ICH mortality (n = 1,119; adjusted HR 1.10 [95% CI 1.03-1.17]) and had marginal significance for early (p = 0.053) and long-term mortality (p = 0.09). Conclusions/interpretation: We found that admission glucose levels were associated with early mortality after ICH. In patients without diabetes, admission glucose levels were associated with long-term mortality. We therefore suggest that intensive lowering of glucose level should be further investigated in ICH patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)429-434
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetologia
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Mar 1

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Cerebral Hemorrhage
Hemorrhage
Glucose
Mortality
Brain
Korea
Hyperglycemia
Stroke
Tomography
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Glucose
  • Intracerebral haemorrhage
  • Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Effects of glucose level on early and long-term mortality after intracerebral haemorrhage : The Acute Brain Bleeding Analysis Study. / Lee, S. H.; Kim, B. J.; Bae, H. J.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, Juneyoung; Park, B. J.; Yoon, B. W.

In: Diabetologia, Vol. 53, No. 3, 01.03.2010, p. 429-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, S. H. ; Kim, B. J. ; Bae, H. J. ; Lee, J. S. ; Lee, Juneyoung ; Park, B. J. ; Yoon, B. W. / Effects of glucose level on early and long-term mortality after intracerebral haemorrhage : The Acute Brain Bleeding Analysis Study. In: Diabetologia. 2010 ; Vol. 53, No. 3. pp. 429-434.
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