Effects of head elevation on intraocular pressure in healthy subjects: Raising bed head vs using multiple pillows

D. Y. Yeon, Chungkwon Yoo, T. E. Lee, J. H. Park, Yong Yeon Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of different methods of head elevation on intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy young subjects. Methods: Twenty-four healthy young Korean subjects were included in this prospective observational study. The IOP measurements were taken with the subjects in the sitting position and in the supine positions with the head flat and 301 up using two different methods: (1) raising the bed head and (2) using multiple pillows. IOP was measured using Tonopen AVIA in both eyes 10 min after assuming each position in a randomized sequence. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the IOP by changing the methods of head elevation. Results: Mean IOP of both eyes when sitting was lower than that measured in the supine position with head flat (P = 0.001). Compared with that measured in the supine position with head flat, the mean IOP was lower when measured in the supine position with the head kept 30° up by bed head elevation (P = 0.001), whereas the mean IOP was not significantly different when measured in the supine position with the head elevated using multiple pillows (right eye, P = 0.061; left eye, P = 0.089). Conclusion: In normal subjects, IOP was lower when measured in the supine position with the head kept up by the bed head elevation compared with that measured when lying flat. However, such head-up position-induced IOP reduction was not found when the head was kept up using multiple pillows. These findings suggest that elevating the head using multiple pillows may not help to reduce IOP in the supine posture.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1328-1333
Number of pages6
JournalEye (Basingstoke)
Volume28
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Nov 1

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Intraocular Pressure
Healthy Volunteers
Head
Supine Position
Posture
Nonparametric Statistics
Observational Studies
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Effects of head elevation on intraocular pressure in healthy subjects : Raising bed head vs using multiple pillows. / Yeon, D. Y.; Yoo, Chungkwon; Lee, T. E.; Park, J. H.; Kim, Yong Yeon.

In: Eye (Basingstoke), Vol. 28, No. 11, 01.11.2014, p. 1328-1333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Purpose: To evaluate the effects of different methods of head elevation on intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy young subjects. Methods: Twenty-four healthy young Korean subjects were included in this prospective observational study. The IOP measurements were taken with the subjects in the sitting position and in the supine positions with the head flat and 301 up using two different methods: (1) raising the bed head and (2) using multiple pillows. IOP was measured using Tonopen AVIA in both eyes 10 min after assuming each position in a randomized sequence. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the IOP by changing the methods of head elevation. Results: Mean IOP of both eyes when sitting was lower than that measured in the supine position with head flat (P = 0.001). Compared with that measured in the supine position with head flat, the mean IOP was lower when measured in the supine position with the head kept 30° up by bed head elevation (P = 0.001), whereas the mean IOP was not significantly different when measured in the supine position with the head elevated using multiple pillows (right eye, P = 0.061; left eye, P = 0.089). Conclusion: In normal subjects, IOP was lower when measured in the supine position with the head kept up by the bed head elevation compared with that measured when lying flat. However, such head-up position-induced IOP reduction was not found when the head was kept up using multiple pillows. These findings suggest that elevating the head using multiple pillows may not help to reduce IOP in the supine posture.

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