Effects of interpupillary distance on stereoacuity

The Frisby Davis distance stereotest versus a 3-dimensional distance stereotest

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Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of interpupillary distance (IPD) on stereoacuity using 2 kinds of stereoacuity tests in a normal population. Methods: The distance stereoacuities of 33 healthy volunteers with no evidence of ocular diseases were measured with the Frisby Davis distance (FD2) stereotest and a 3-dimensional monitor-based distance stereotest (distance 3-D stereotest). These 2 kinds of stereotests were repeated using horizontal periscopes to increase the IPD 2- and 3-fold in order to investigate the effect of IPD increase on stereoacuity. Results: The mean age of the participants was 28.5 years (range 20-41 years). The mean logarithms of the individual minimum angle of stereodiscrimination (logMAS) were 1.04 ± 0.23 (range 0.70-1.48 logMAS) with the FD2 stereotest and 1.52 ± 0.19 (range 1.00-1.85 logMAS) with the distance 3-D stereotest. As the IPD increased 2- and 3-fold, the logMAS measured with the FD2 stereotest improved from 1.04 to 0.98 and 0.91 (P = 0.061 and P = 0.003), respectively, and those measured with the distance 3-D stereotest worsened from 1.52 to 1.73 and 1.85 (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: Changes in IPD measured with the FD2 stereotest exhibited opposite effects to those measured with the distance 3-D stereotest. This reflects what is known to happen in the real world, i.e., that stereoacuity improves as IPD increases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)486-492
Number of pages7
JournalJapanese Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume57
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Sep 1

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Eye Diseases
Healthy Volunteers
Population

Keywords

  • 3-dimensional stereotest
  • Frisby Davis distance stereotest
  • Interpupillary distance
  • Stereoacuity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

@article{5e1bac98b84348b4a72dc2afd6d52c30,
title = "Effects of interpupillary distance on stereoacuity: The Frisby Davis distance stereotest versus a 3-dimensional distance stereotest",
abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate the effect of interpupillary distance (IPD) on stereoacuity using 2 kinds of stereoacuity tests in a normal population. Methods: The distance stereoacuities of 33 healthy volunteers with no evidence of ocular diseases were measured with the Frisby Davis distance (FD2) stereotest and a 3-dimensional monitor-based distance stereotest (distance 3-D stereotest). These 2 kinds of stereotests were repeated using horizontal periscopes to increase the IPD 2- and 3-fold in order to investigate the effect of IPD increase on stereoacuity. Results: The mean age of the participants was 28.5 years (range 20-41 years). The mean logarithms of the individual minimum angle of stereodiscrimination (logMAS) were 1.04 ± 0.23 (range 0.70-1.48 logMAS) with the FD2 stereotest and 1.52 ± 0.19 (range 1.00-1.85 logMAS) with the distance 3-D stereotest. As the IPD increased 2- and 3-fold, the logMAS measured with the FD2 stereotest improved from 1.04 to 0.98 and 0.91 (P = 0.061 and P = 0.003), respectively, and those measured with the distance 3-D stereotest worsened from 1.52 to 1.73 and 1.85 (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: Changes in IPD measured with the FD2 stereotest exhibited opposite effects to those measured with the distance 3-D stereotest. This reflects what is known to happen in the real world, i.e., that stereoacuity improves as IPD increases.",
keywords = "3-dimensional stereotest, Frisby Davis distance stereotest, Interpupillary distance, Stereoacuity",
author = "Youngsub Eom and Jong-Suk Song and Ahn, {Soh Eun} and Kang, {Su Yeon} and Young-Woo Suh and Oh, {Jae Ryung} and Kim, {Seung Hyun} and Kim, {Hyo Myung}",
year = "2013",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10384-013-0253-9",
language = "English",
volume = "57",
pages = "486--492",
journal = "Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology",
issn = "0021-5155",
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number = "5",

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T1 - Effects of interpupillary distance on stereoacuity

T2 - The Frisby Davis distance stereotest versus a 3-dimensional distance stereotest

AU - Eom, Youngsub

AU - Song, Jong-Suk

AU - Ahn, Soh Eun

AU - Kang, Su Yeon

AU - Suh, Young-Woo

AU - Oh, Jae Ryung

AU - Kim, Seung Hyun

AU - Kim, Hyo Myung

PY - 2013/9/1

Y1 - 2013/9/1

N2 - Purpose: To evaluate the effect of interpupillary distance (IPD) on stereoacuity using 2 kinds of stereoacuity tests in a normal population. Methods: The distance stereoacuities of 33 healthy volunteers with no evidence of ocular diseases were measured with the Frisby Davis distance (FD2) stereotest and a 3-dimensional monitor-based distance stereotest (distance 3-D stereotest). These 2 kinds of stereotests were repeated using horizontal periscopes to increase the IPD 2- and 3-fold in order to investigate the effect of IPD increase on stereoacuity. Results: The mean age of the participants was 28.5 years (range 20-41 years). The mean logarithms of the individual minimum angle of stereodiscrimination (logMAS) were 1.04 ± 0.23 (range 0.70-1.48 logMAS) with the FD2 stereotest and 1.52 ± 0.19 (range 1.00-1.85 logMAS) with the distance 3-D stereotest. As the IPD increased 2- and 3-fold, the logMAS measured with the FD2 stereotest improved from 1.04 to 0.98 and 0.91 (P = 0.061 and P = 0.003), respectively, and those measured with the distance 3-D stereotest worsened from 1.52 to 1.73 and 1.85 (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: Changes in IPD measured with the FD2 stereotest exhibited opposite effects to those measured with the distance 3-D stereotest. This reflects what is known to happen in the real world, i.e., that stereoacuity improves as IPD increases.

AB - Purpose: To evaluate the effect of interpupillary distance (IPD) on stereoacuity using 2 kinds of stereoacuity tests in a normal population. Methods: The distance stereoacuities of 33 healthy volunteers with no evidence of ocular diseases were measured with the Frisby Davis distance (FD2) stereotest and a 3-dimensional monitor-based distance stereotest (distance 3-D stereotest). These 2 kinds of stereotests were repeated using horizontal periscopes to increase the IPD 2- and 3-fold in order to investigate the effect of IPD increase on stereoacuity. Results: The mean age of the participants was 28.5 years (range 20-41 years). The mean logarithms of the individual minimum angle of stereodiscrimination (logMAS) were 1.04 ± 0.23 (range 0.70-1.48 logMAS) with the FD2 stereotest and 1.52 ± 0.19 (range 1.00-1.85 logMAS) with the distance 3-D stereotest. As the IPD increased 2- and 3-fold, the logMAS measured with the FD2 stereotest improved from 1.04 to 0.98 and 0.91 (P = 0.061 and P = 0.003), respectively, and those measured with the distance 3-D stereotest worsened from 1.52 to 1.73 and 1.85 (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: Changes in IPD measured with the FD2 stereotest exhibited opposite effects to those measured with the distance 3-D stereotest. This reflects what is known to happen in the real world, i.e., that stereoacuity improves as IPD increases.

KW - 3-dimensional stereotest

KW - Frisby Davis distance stereotest

KW - Interpupillary distance

KW - Stereoacuity

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U2 - 10.1007/s10384-013-0253-9

DO - 10.1007/s10384-013-0253-9

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JO - Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology

JF - Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology

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