Effects of Korean red ginseng on cognitive and motor function

A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

Hye Bin Yeo, Ho-Kyoung Yoon, Heon-Jeong Lee, Seung Gul Kang, Ki Young Jung, Leen Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ginseng has a long history of use for health enhancement, and there is some evidence from animal studies that it has a beneficial effect on cognitive performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Korean red ginseng on cognitive performance in humans. A total of 15 healthy young males with no psychiatric or cognitive problems were selected based on an interview with a board-certified psychiatrist. The subjects were randomly assigned to receive a daily dose of 4,500 mg red ginseng or placebo for a 2-week trial. There were 8 subjects in the red ginseng group and 7 subjects in the placebo group. All of the subjects were analyzed with the Vienna test system and a P300 event-related potential (ERP) test. There were no significant differences in the Vienna test system scores between the red ginseng group and the placebo group. In the event-related potential test, the C3 latency of the red ginseng group tended to decrease during the study period (p=0.005). After 2 wk, significant decreases were observed in the P300 latencies at Cz (p=0.008), C3 (p=0.005), C4 (p=0.002), and C mean (p=0.003) in the red ginseng group. Our results suggest that the decreased latency in ERP is associated with improved cognitive function. Further studies with a higher dosage of ginseng, a larger sample size, and a longer follow-up period are necessary to confirm the clinical efficacy of Korean red ginseng.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)190-197
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Ginseng Research
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Apr 1

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Panax
Cognition
placebos
Randomized Controlled Trials
Placebos
Animals
Health
cognition
Evoked Potentials
Austria
Psychiatry
testing
P300 Event-Related Potentials
dosage
Sample Size
interviews
Interviews

Keywords

  • Cognitive and motor function
  • Evoked potentials
  • Korean red ginseng
  • Panax ginseng
  • Vienna test system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Plant Science
  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Effects of Korean red ginseng on cognitive and motor function : A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. / Yeo, Hye Bin; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Kang, Seung Gul; Jung, Ki Young; Kim, Leen.

In: Journal of Ginseng Research, Vol. 36, No. 2, 01.04.2012, p. 190-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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