Effects of low serum triglyceride on stroke mortality

A prospective follow-up study

Wi Sun Ryu, Seung Hoon Lee, Chi Kyung Kim, Beom Joon Kim, Byung Woo Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Low serum triglyceride (TG) has been suggested as a predictor of mortality after cardiovascular disease. However, the relationship between the level of TGs and the outcome after stroke remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that the influence of TG levels on post-stroke mortality varies according to stroke mechanism: cardioembolic (CE) vs. non-CE causes. Methods: We prospectively enrolled a consecutive series of patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke for 5 years (n= 1067), and followed them until the end of 2007 to obtain information on mortality and cause of death. We divided the level of TG into the quartiles, and classified the patients into CE (n= 226) and non-CE stroke groups (n= 841). The influence of TG level on mortality (all-cause death and vascular death) was examined by univariate and multivariate analyses using Cox regression. Result: All-cause death and vascular death rates showed inverse relationships to the quartiles of TG levels in all patients (p< 0.001, both) and also in non-CE stroke group (p< 0.001, both), but not in CE stroke group (p= 0.17 and p= 0.37, respectively). In the Cox-regression analysis, compared with the highest quartile, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of the lowest quartile for all-cause death was 2.58 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.38-4.82] and that for vascular death was 3.50 (95% CI, 1.39-8.82) in non-CE stroke group. These same associations, however, were not significant in CE stroke group. Conclusion: Our results indicate that low serum TG is an independent predictor of mortality after ischemic stroke brought on by non-CE causes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-304
Number of pages6
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume212
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Sep 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Triglycerides
Stroke
Mortality
Serum
Cause of Death
Blood Vessels
Confidence Intervals
Cardiovascular Diseases
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Atherothrombotic
  • Cardioembolic
  • Mortality
  • Stroke
  • Triglyceride

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Effects of low serum triglyceride on stroke mortality : A prospective follow-up study. / Ryu, Wi Sun; Lee, Seung Hoon; Kim, Chi Kyung; Kim, Beom Joon; Yoon, Byung Woo.

In: Atherosclerosis, Vol. 212, No. 1, 01.09.2010, p. 299-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ryu, Wi Sun ; Lee, Seung Hoon ; Kim, Chi Kyung ; Kim, Beom Joon ; Yoon, Byung Woo. / Effects of low serum triglyceride on stroke mortality : A prospective follow-up study. In: Atherosclerosis. 2010 ; Vol. 212, No. 1. pp. 299-304.
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N2 - Background: Low serum triglyceride (TG) has been suggested as a predictor of mortality after cardiovascular disease. However, the relationship between the level of TGs and the outcome after stroke remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that the influence of TG levels on post-stroke mortality varies according to stroke mechanism: cardioembolic (CE) vs. non-CE causes. Methods: We prospectively enrolled a consecutive series of patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke for 5 years (n= 1067), and followed them until the end of 2007 to obtain information on mortality and cause of death. We divided the level of TG into the quartiles, and classified the patients into CE (n= 226) and non-CE stroke groups (n= 841). The influence of TG level on mortality (all-cause death and vascular death) was examined by univariate and multivariate analyses using Cox regression. Result: All-cause death and vascular death rates showed inverse relationships to the quartiles of TG levels in all patients (p< 0.001, both) and also in non-CE stroke group (p< 0.001, both), but not in CE stroke group (p= 0.17 and p= 0.37, respectively). In the Cox-regression analysis, compared with the highest quartile, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of the lowest quartile for all-cause death was 2.58 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.38-4.82] and that for vascular death was 3.50 (95% CI, 1.39-8.82) in non-CE stroke group. These same associations, however, were not significant in CE stroke group. Conclusion: Our results indicate that low serum TG is an independent predictor of mortality after ischemic stroke brought on by non-CE causes.

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