Effects of motor imagery training on balance and gait abilities in post-stroke patients

A randomized controlled trial

Hwi Young Cho, Junesun Kim, Gyu Chang Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effects of motor imagery training on the balance and gait abilities of post-stroke patients. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Outpatient rehabilitation centre. Subjects: Twenty-eight individuals with chronic stroke. Interventions: The experimental group (n = 15) performed motor imagery training involving imagining normal gait movement for 15 minutes embedded in gait training for 30 minutes (45 minutes/day, 3 times/week); the control group (n = 13) performed gait training only (30 minutes/day, 3 times/week). Main measures: Balance and gait abilities were measured by the Functional Reach Test, Timed Up-and-Go Test, 10-m Walk Test and Fugl-Meyer assessment before and after interventions. Results: All measurements improved significantly compared with baseline values in the experimental group. In the control group, there were significant improvements in all parameters except the Fugl-Meyer assessment. All parameters of the experimental group increased significantly compared to those of the control group as follows: Functional Reach Test (control vs. experimental: 28.1 ± 3.1 vs. 37.51 ± 3.0), Timed Up-and-Go Test (20.7 ± 4.0 vs. 13.2 ± 2.2), 10-m Walk Test (17.4 ± 4.6 vs. 16.0 ± 2.7) and Fugl-Meyer assessment (12.0 ± 2.9 vs. 17.6 ± 1.3). Conclusions: Gait training with motor imagery training improves the balance and gait abilities of chronic stroke patients significantly better than gait training alone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)675-680
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Rehabilitation
Volume27
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Aug 1

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Aptitude
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Gait
Randomized Controlled Trials
Stroke
Control Groups
Rehabilitation Centers
Outpatients

Keywords

  • balance
  • gait
  • motor imagery
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effects of motor imagery training on balance and gait abilities in post-stroke patients : A randomized controlled trial. / Cho, Hwi Young; Kim, Junesun; Lee, Gyu Chang.

In: Clinical Rehabilitation, Vol. 27, No. 8, 01.08.2013, p. 675-680.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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