Effects of propofol or desflurane on post-operative spirometry in elderly after knee surgery

A double-blind randomised study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Intravenous or volatile agents reduce respiratory function, which can result in respiratory complications in geriatric patients. We hypothesised that there would be no differences in lung function between anaesthesia established using either drug. Methods Elderly patients were randomly assigned to receive either propofol with remifentanil (n=48) or desflurane (DES) with remifentanil (n=52) for knee surgery. Spirometry tests including forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced mid-expiratory flow (FEF25-75), and FEV1/FVC ratio were performed preoperatively, and 30min, 60min, and 24h after awakening. Emergence time and post-operative pain scores were also measured. Results Time to emergence was significantly longer in the propofol than in the DES group (17.0 vs. 12.5min, P=0.04). Post-operative FEV1 (1.6 or 1.4l, P=0.68 between groups) were significantly lower than preoperative values (2.1 or 2.0l, P=0.001 vs. post-operative values, respectively) in both groups. Reduced FEV1 lasted for 24h after surgery (1.7 or 1.6l, P=0.001 vs. preoperative values, respectively). Post-operative FVC or FEF25-75 were lower than preoperative values. FEV1/FVC ratio did not change during the study period in both groups. There was no difference in FEV1, FVC, FEF25-75, FEV1/FVC, and post-operative pain between the two anaesthetic techniques. Conclusions Although there is a delay in awakening when using propofol, the effects of propofol on post-operative spirometry parameters are similar to those of DES when anaesthesia duration is approximately 3h. Decreased respiratory parameters persisted up to 24h after anaesthesia, irrespective of the choice of anaesthetic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)788-795
Number of pages8
JournalActa Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
Volume59
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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Spirometry
Forced Expiratory Volume
Propofol
Double-Blind Method
Vital Capacity
Knee
Anesthesia
Anesthetics
Pain
Operative Time
desflurane
Geriatrics
Lung
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

@article{81d239a843554bd6983e02c2369a34ea,
title = "Effects of propofol or desflurane on post-operative spirometry in elderly after knee surgery: A double-blind randomised study",
abstract = "Background Intravenous or volatile agents reduce respiratory function, which can result in respiratory complications in geriatric patients. We hypothesised that there would be no differences in lung function between anaesthesia established using either drug. Methods Elderly patients were randomly assigned to receive either propofol with remifentanil (n=48) or desflurane (DES) with remifentanil (n=52) for knee surgery. Spirometry tests including forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced mid-expiratory flow (FEF25-75), and FEV1/FVC ratio were performed preoperatively, and 30min, 60min, and 24h after awakening. Emergence time and post-operative pain scores were also measured. Results Time to emergence was significantly longer in the propofol than in the DES group (17.0 vs. 12.5min, P=0.04). Post-operative FEV1 (1.6 or 1.4l, P=0.68 between groups) were significantly lower than preoperative values (2.1 or 2.0l, P=0.001 vs. post-operative values, respectively) in both groups. Reduced FEV1 lasted for 24h after surgery (1.7 or 1.6l, P=0.001 vs. preoperative values, respectively). Post-operative FVC or FEF25-75 were lower than preoperative values. FEV1/FVC ratio did not change during the study period in both groups. There was no difference in FEV1, FVC, FEF25-75, FEV1/FVC, and post-operative pain between the two anaesthetic techniques. Conclusions Although there is a delay in awakening when using propofol, the effects of propofol on post-operative spirometry parameters are similar to those of DES when anaesthesia duration is approximately 3h. Decreased respiratory parameters persisted up to 24h after anaesthesia, irrespective of the choice of anaesthetic.",
author = "Kim, {Y. S.} and Lim, {Byung Gun} and Heezoo Kim and Myounghoon Kong and Lee, {Il Ok}",
year = "2015",
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language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "788--795",
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T1 - Effects of propofol or desflurane on post-operative spirometry in elderly after knee surgery

T2 - A double-blind randomised study

AU - Kim, Y. S.

AU - Lim, Byung Gun

AU - Kim, Heezoo

AU - Kong, Myounghoon

AU - Lee, Il Ok

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background Intravenous or volatile agents reduce respiratory function, which can result in respiratory complications in geriatric patients. We hypothesised that there would be no differences in lung function between anaesthesia established using either drug. Methods Elderly patients were randomly assigned to receive either propofol with remifentanil (n=48) or desflurane (DES) with remifentanil (n=52) for knee surgery. Spirometry tests including forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced mid-expiratory flow (FEF25-75), and FEV1/FVC ratio were performed preoperatively, and 30min, 60min, and 24h after awakening. Emergence time and post-operative pain scores were also measured. Results Time to emergence was significantly longer in the propofol than in the DES group (17.0 vs. 12.5min, P=0.04). Post-operative FEV1 (1.6 or 1.4l, P=0.68 between groups) were significantly lower than preoperative values (2.1 or 2.0l, P=0.001 vs. post-operative values, respectively) in both groups. Reduced FEV1 lasted for 24h after surgery (1.7 or 1.6l, P=0.001 vs. preoperative values, respectively). Post-operative FVC or FEF25-75 were lower than preoperative values. FEV1/FVC ratio did not change during the study period in both groups. There was no difference in FEV1, FVC, FEF25-75, FEV1/FVC, and post-operative pain between the two anaesthetic techniques. Conclusions Although there is a delay in awakening when using propofol, the effects of propofol on post-operative spirometry parameters are similar to those of DES when anaesthesia duration is approximately 3h. Decreased respiratory parameters persisted up to 24h after anaesthesia, irrespective of the choice of anaesthetic.

AB - Background Intravenous or volatile agents reduce respiratory function, which can result in respiratory complications in geriatric patients. We hypothesised that there would be no differences in lung function between anaesthesia established using either drug. Methods Elderly patients were randomly assigned to receive either propofol with remifentanil (n=48) or desflurane (DES) with remifentanil (n=52) for knee surgery. Spirometry tests including forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced mid-expiratory flow (FEF25-75), and FEV1/FVC ratio were performed preoperatively, and 30min, 60min, and 24h after awakening. Emergence time and post-operative pain scores were also measured. Results Time to emergence was significantly longer in the propofol than in the DES group (17.0 vs. 12.5min, P=0.04). Post-operative FEV1 (1.6 or 1.4l, P=0.68 between groups) were significantly lower than preoperative values (2.1 or 2.0l, P=0.001 vs. post-operative values, respectively) in both groups. Reduced FEV1 lasted for 24h after surgery (1.7 or 1.6l, P=0.001 vs. preoperative values, respectively). Post-operative FVC or FEF25-75 were lower than preoperative values. FEV1/FVC ratio did not change during the study period in both groups. There was no difference in FEV1, FVC, FEF25-75, FEV1/FVC, and post-operative pain between the two anaesthetic techniques. Conclusions Although there is a delay in awakening when using propofol, the effects of propofol on post-operative spirometry parameters are similar to those of DES when anaesthesia duration is approximately 3h. Decreased respiratory parameters persisted up to 24h after anaesthesia, irrespective of the choice of anaesthetic.

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SN - 0001-5172

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