Effects of sample size and temperature on coarse woody debris respiration from Quercus variabilis logs

Tae Kyung Yoon, Saerom Han, Dongho Lee, Seung Hyun Han, Nam Jin Noh, Yo Whan Son

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Measuring coarse woody debris (CWD) respiration (R CWD) may have advantages over other approaches in determining CWD decomposition rates to accurately estimate forest carbon budgets and effects of warm temperatures on decomposition; however, studies on R CWD are insufficient. The R CWD from Quercus variabilis logs of different sizes (e.g., different surface area to weight ratios or weights) was measured under homogeneous conditions by using a closed-chamber system with a non-dispersive infrared sensor. The size effect on R CWD measured on a weight or volume basis was not significant, but it was significant on a surface area basis. This indicates that R CWD on a weight or volume basis would be a reliable measure, regardless of the size and cross-sectional area effects, while R CWD on a surface area basis must vary geometrically according to the change in sample size. R CWD did not change significantly over time until 122 h after sampling. An exponential model with a Q 10 of 2.34 was fitted only at temperatures below 22.6 °C because R CWD was suppressed at high temperatures due to constantly decreasing moisture. Instead, a logistic model was applied for all temperatures. The annual R CWD and the decay rate constant were estimated to be 53.4 g C kg-1 year-1 and 0.107 year-1, respectively. The decomposition rate estimate through R CWD might not correspond to that using the mass loss approach. It remains uncertain whether the methodological differences may lead to potential errors in measuring the actual CWD decomposition rate; therefore, a multiple approach study for CWD decomposition should be conducted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)249-259
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Forest Research
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Apr 1

Fingerprint

coarse woody debris
respiration
temperature
sampling
decomposition
degradation
surface area
effect
Quercus variabilis
size effect
carbon budget
logit analysis

Keywords

  • Closed chamber
  • Decay rate constant
  • Logistic model
  • Q
  • R

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry

Cite this

Effects of sample size and temperature on coarse woody debris respiration from Quercus variabilis logs. / Yoon, Tae Kyung; Han, Saerom; Lee, Dongho; Han, Seung Hyun; Noh, Nam Jin; Son, Yo Whan.

In: Journal of Forest Research, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.04.2014, p. 249-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yoon, Tae Kyung ; Han, Saerom ; Lee, Dongho ; Han, Seung Hyun ; Noh, Nam Jin ; Son, Yo Whan. / Effects of sample size and temperature on coarse woody debris respiration from Quercus variabilis logs. In: Journal of Forest Research. 2014 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 249-259.
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