Effects of spatial smoothing and physiological noise removal on brain activity with cigarette craving

Minkyung Oh, Jong-Hwan Lee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The purpose of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to investigate the effects of smoothing kernel size and the extent of physiological noise correction on neuronal activity estimation. The fMRI data acquired from heavy smokers were used to evaluate the effect of preprocessing options. Three different smoothing kernel sizes (i.e., 4, 6, and 8 mm) were applied to compare neuronal activation between two different conditions (e.g., abstained and satiated conditions). In addition, the physiological noise was extracted from white matter and cerebrospinal fluid via principal component analysis and different numbers of the principal components (PCs) were removed (i.e., 0, 1, 3, and 5). As results, as smoothing kernel size increased, the more number of voxels survived in a group-level analysis. Also, removing 3 noise-related PCs leaded to the largest statistical value within activated foci compared to the other cases.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication3rd International Winter Conference on Brain-Computer Interface, BCI 2015
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Print)9781479974948
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Mar 30
Event2015 3rd International Winter Conference on Brain-Computer Interface, BCI 2015 - Gangwon-Do, Korea, Republic of
Duration: 2015 Jan 122015 Jan 14

Other

Other2015 3rd International Winter Conference on Brain-Computer Interface, BCI 2015
CountryKorea, Republic of
CityGangwon-Do
Period15/1/1215/1/14

Keywords

  • Functional magnetic resonance imagine (fMRI)
  • physiological noise
  • preprocessing
  • principal component anlaysis
  • smoothing kernel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Sensory Systems

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of spatial smoothing and physiological noise removal on brain activity with cigarette craving'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Oh, M., & Lee, J-H. (2015). Effects of spatial smoothing and physiological noise removal on brain activity with cigarette craving. In 3rd International Winter Conference on Brain-Computer Interface, BCI 2015 [7073042] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/IWW-BCI.2015.7073042